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Collaborative Regional Development

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Collaborative Regional Development

Development decisions by individual communities sometimes have regional implications and should be guided by broad and long-range views about the way the region’s communities inter-relate. As the region grows, a collaborative approach to development can work to the benefit of all member municipalities ensuring the e!cient use of land and the promotion of a high quality of life for residents.

Read the full report here.

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Principles

Information Sharing

The cornerstone of collaboration is information sharing. In support of informed decision-making, development-related research and data should be collected by and made available to all Capital Region members and stakeholders.

Regional Consistency

Regulations and procedures that govern development in the region should, to the greatest degree, be consistent from municipality to municipality in the Capital Region.

Centralization

Development services and resources should be concentrated (virtually, if not physically) in order to promote efficiency and strengthen consistency while projecting the image of 'thinking and acting as a region'.

Sound Planning

Growth in the Capital Region should be managed through planning decisions that direct new development to existing settlement centres, protect agricultural lands and encourage mixed land use allowing residents the opportunity to live, work and play in their community with minimal travel.

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Strategies and Goals

Build a Knowledge Base for Planning and Development

UNDERSTAND THE MANITOBA CAPITAL REGION
Developing a fundamental understanding of settlement and land use in the Capital Region requires research in areas such as population distribution and growth projections, efficiency of infrastructure, current land use patterns, travel patterns and distances, and existing services.

IDENTIFY AND PROMOTE BEST PRACTICES IN REGIONAL PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT
‘Best practice’ research on sustainable development policies, programs, infrastructure, regulations, and other regional areas of interest can help establish appropriate strategies.

DEVELOP AND SHARE PLANNING RESOURCES
Regional research, common base-maps and plans and a consolidated database can serve as a resource for planning and development across the Capital Region.

Foster Collaboration Among Municipalities and Stakeholders

FACILITATE AND PROMOTE COLLABORATIVE EFFORTS AMONG MEMBERS
Open and frank discussions among board members, councils and administrations is the first step in promoting collaboration in matters of regional interest.

WORK EFFECTIVELY WITH THE PROVINCE OF MANITOBA
The Government of Manitoba establishes the regulatory framework and provides resources for regional planning and, as such, is a critically important partner.

BUILD MUTUALLY-BENEFICIAL RELATIONSHIPS WITH KEY STAKEHOLDERS
A number of public and private sector organizations such as CentrePort, Economic Development Winnipeg, the Association of Manitoba Municipalities, among many others, are potential partners in the pursuit of Collaborative Regional Development.

Adopt Supportive Planning Structures and Processes

BUILD UNDERSTANDING ON DEVELOPMENT PLANNING DECISIONS
Engaging all planning authorities in the review and update of development plans can promote a spirit of mutual accountability and respect.

FACILITATE THE PREPARATION OF PLANS AND EXPEDITE DEVELOPMENT APPROVALS
Process improvements that promote timely but thoughtful planning decisions can help build regional unity and increase efficiency.

OPTIMIZE PROVINCIAL SUPPORT SERVICES AND LEGISLATIVE PROCESSES
The province plays a key role in supporting, reviewing, and approving the processes related to development plans and development applications. Creating opportunities to engage with various departments during the process will support better planning in a timely manner.

Support Municipal Planning with a Regional Vision

ESTABLISH A LONG-TERM VISION FOR THE CAPITAL REGION
A Manitoba Capital Region Plan can be useful in establishing a common foundation or framework for official development plans.

DEVELOP REGIONAL STRATEGIES OR MASTER PLANS
Regional Master Plans can act to inform development plans prepared by local planning authorities and become a framework for consistency, streamlining the development plan approval process.

WORK TOWARD THE CONSOLIDATION OF DEVELOPMENT PLANS
The eight planning authorities in the region each have their own development plan which, over time, may be consolidated into sub-regional plans to further streamline the approval and review process.

Promote Public Engagement and Communication

PREPARE A COMMUNICATIONS STRATEGY
A comprehensive strategy will enhance buy in for regional thinking to promote principles of regional partnership as an approach to sustainable community development.

ENCOURAGE FACE-TO-FACE OPPORTUNITIES FOR PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT
Workshops, forums, open houses, among other options, can be effective in promoting discussions about regional issues and soliciting valuable feedback from various stakeholder groups.

PROMOTE UNDERSTANDING OF THE PMCR AND ITS ACTIVITIES
An effective, engaging, and accessible PMCR website and communication tools can help to share information about the region and support public discussion. Social media can be an effective tool for virtual conversations on regional issues and opportunities to ensure all Capital Region municipalities have access to the most current information on a variety of fronts.

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Collaborative Regional Development

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Transportation and Shared Services

If the Capital Region is to function effectively as more than the sum of its parts, it will be largely due to the manner in which the provision of services and infrastructure are addressed on a regional scale. Addressing transportation as a comprehensive, integrated network is fundamental as is the pursuit of service-sharing agreements to promote an expanded range of services while ensuring the e!cient use of resources.

Read the full report here.

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Principles

Interconnectedness

Interconnectedness is a given in today’s technology age, a concept that applies in a like manner to the physical environment whereby a variety of transportation options is supportive of a mix of land uses which in turn is supported by requisite hard and soft infrastructure and other public services.

Balanced Mobility Options

While road systems for the effective movement of people and goods remains a high priority, this must be balanced with alternative transportation options like public transit, car pooling, cycling, and walking that can benefit the region through healthier lifestyle choices, the reduced traffic congestion, and improvements in air quality.

Regional Cooperation

Developing a regional perspective towards services requires that we have good information regarding current trends and issues and that we keep all stakeholders informed about the benefits of regional cooperation towards service delivery.

Equity in Service Provision

While it is understood that not every resident and business can have 'equal' access to all public services, a commitment to ‘equity’ implies a desire to ensure fairness in service provision, balancing expectations with cost and practicality.

Effective and E!cient Use of Resources

Driven by the reasonable public expectation for the wise use of public dollars and for transparent and accountable decision-making, resources need to be used in a manner that maximizes public benefit with measurable results.

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Strategies and Goals

Implement a Regional Transportation Plan

ENSURE THE EFFICIENT AND SAFE MOVEMENT OF PEOPLE AND GOODS IN THE REGION
The efficient movement of people and goods through improved infrastructure and transportation services can help foster economic development while paying attention to safety.

ALIGN TRANSPORTATION, LAND USE PLANNING AND INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT
An effective transportation master plan can help integrate transportation with land use while establishing priorities for public investment in infrastructure.

ADVANCE ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY FOR THE TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM
Carpooling, park-and-rides and other multi-modal transportation options will advance environmental sustainability objectives. Research current transportation modes and travel distances and assess the feasibility and potential priority areas for public transportation and car pooling options

PURSUE ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION OPPORTUNITIES
Walking, cycling and other forms of active transportation for recreation, tourism and commuting purposes can enhance personal health and community livability while fostering regional and inter-municipal collaboration.

EXTEND TRANSIT SYSTEM CONNECTIONS
The extension of existing transit systems through route extensions, feeder routes and bus rapid transit connections can serve to enhance mobility and increase the livability for Capital Region communities.

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Transportation and Shared Services

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News, Events and Workshops

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Threatened Infrastructure - Workshop May 7, 2015

THREATENED INFRASTRUCTURE
Canada's Changing Water Cycle and Its Consequences.

Bigger storms, larger floods and more unpredictable weather are taking a toll on expensive infrastructure here and around the world; we are largely unprepared for these changes. Join the Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region for an action orientated one-day session aimed at deepening our understating of the changing water cycle, its consequences and what we can do to build resiliency in our communities.

THREATENED INFRASTRUCTURE -

The global water cycle is changing; it is being energized by changes in the composition of the Earth’s atmosphere. Our municipal and provincial infrastructure is designed for a climatic regime that no longer exists, the Red River Basin, for example, has experienced 10 one in 100 year flooding events in the past 25 years and extreme weather events across the country are causing more damage, more frequently to vulnerable urban and rural infrastructure.

In this timely presentation, Bob Sandford EPCOR Chair for Water Security at the United Nations Institute for Water, Environment and Health at United Nations University and Roger Rempel a senior Environmental Engineer and Climate Change Adaptation Specialist will explore what is happening, why it matters, and what communities can do to build the level of resilience that will permit them to sustain prosperity well into the future.

Bob and Roger will be joined by experts from construction, agriculture, insurance, transportation, energy, architecture, engineering, and emergency services with the aim of exploring where are vulnerabilities lie, long term and immediate actions toward proactively building a level of resilience that will allow our communities to sustain prosperity well into the future.

Click here to register for THREATENED INFRASTRUCTURES - Canada's Changing Water Cycle and Its Consequences

Workshop & Registration Details
May 7, 2015, 8:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m, in Winnipeg, Manitoba
at the Metropolitan Entertainment Centre.

Booking a room?
**A special rate has been established at the Radisson Winnipeg at a cost of $139 per night. Indicate that you are part of the Manitoba Capital Region when calling 204.975.6221 or 204.975.6238 to take advantage of this rate! This deal will not be available after April 16.

Who Should Attend:

  • Municipal Leaders from Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba
  • Federal Representatives
  • Planning Officials
  • Provincial Representatives
  • Economic Development Organizations
  • Chief Administrative Officers
  • Builders and Construction Companies
  • Economic Development Professionals
  • Engineers
  • Institutional Leaders
  • Architects
  • Health Officials
  • Contractors
  • Emergency Measures and Planning Leaders
  • Business and Industry Leaders
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Regional Economic Development Forum - April 7, 2015

Regional Economic Development Forum
April 7, 2015
8:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Delta Hotel Winnipeg

On April 7, 2015 the Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region (PMCR) and Economic Development Winnipeg will be hosting a one-day Economic Development Forum.

The session is designed to bring community leaders, business, industry, economic development organizations and government together to explore a Regional Approach to Economic Development and to:

  • build a better understanding of the current economic landscape of Manitoba’s Capital Region;
  • explore our regions readiness for economic growth;
  • identify information needed, and next steps in developing a Regional Approach to Economic Development;
  • develop an understanding and next steps for decision makers to pull in a common direction, building on the regions advantages.

This session will include a panel discussion with our guests and selected leaders from industry, agricultural, education and manufacturing sectors to reflect on the days discussions and speak to how they see their respective sectors being affected or reflected in changes to the economic strategy for the Capital Region. During this forum next steps will be identified in order to facilitate a Regional Approach to Economic Development.

We are proud to welcome the following presenters:

Ruth Mealy, Manitoba Agriculture Food and Rural Development will:

  • present the 2015 - Capital Region, Regional Economic Analysis Process Report (REAP);
  • review the most up-to-date data to provide demographic and business facts for the Capital Region;
  • present unique regional strengths, potential competitive advantages and business opportunities identified through the process.

Gregg Wassmansdorf, Senior Managing Director in Newmark Grubb Knight Frank’s Global Corporate Services Division will:

  • outline what business and industry are looking for when they consider locating or relocating operations;
  • explore the questions; are we ready for business in Manitoba’s Capital Region? Are we aligned in our approach? What can we do better to attract new business and encourage growth across the Capital Region?

Jeremy Heigh, Principal Economist of Sift Every Thing Corporation through an analysis of the current data available to decision makers today will:

  • identify what is known of the region’s jurisdictional advantage and what remains to be assessed, answering the question, do we have clear evidence and everything we need for leaders to pilot through the maze of interests and pull in a common direction that builds on the region’s strength?
  • Provide insight into some next steps in creating a cohesive and comprehensive Regional Strategy, in light of his work in similar projects in Alberta and Saskatchewan.

Regional Economic Development is one of the priorities of the Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region. In Building Something Big - "A Blueprint for Collaboration In The Manitoba Capital Region", Capital Region Leaders identified strategies and goals to build a strong economical competitive region through a coordinated approach.

Workshop & Registration Details
Tuesday, April 7, 2015, 8:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m, in Winnipeg, Manitoba
at the Delta Winnipeg.

Cost is $125.00 for the FULL DAY SESSION including a Continental Breakfast, coffee breaks, lunch, and resource.

Register Today as space is limited!

REGISTER HERE!

Interested in Sponsorship Opportunities? Contact us.

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SOLD OUT! Transporting the Capital Region Forward:
Launch event for the Capital Region Transportation Master Plan

Directions and action from the new Capital Region Master Plan
PLUS our airport & our region

Transportation networks are fluid, connecting beyond our municipal boundaries to the workforce, resources and opportunity that drive our growth as a Region.Strong regional connections help us grow sustainably and complete internationally, transporting us forward, together.

Launch event:
Tuesday, June 10, 2014
9:00a.m. – 1:00p.m.
Stevenson Room, Lobby Level | Four Points by Sheraton Winnipeg Airport
1999 Wellington Avenue

Presented with PMCR Supporting Partner: Winnipeg Airports Authority

Program:

9:00a.m.     Registration, greetings and refreshments

9:30a.m.     Opening remarks

10:00a.m.    Directions and actions from the Capital Region Transportation Master Plan
The new transportation master plan will guide Capital Region transportation infrastructure, planning and systems over the next 25 years as the rapidly growing region continues to attract both new investment and new families.

10:30a.m.    Airport City, Greg Dandewich, Economic Development Winnipeg
The Airport City concept looks at the roles of aviation and airports in shaping 21st-century business location, urban competitiveness, and economic growth. This concept, has triggered widespread interest in examining the impact of airport activity, land and connectivity to economic growth within cities and regions. The approach provides a process from which to evaluate infrastructure assets, land assets and their connectivity with existing economic clusters.

11:00a.m.     Our Region, Our Airport, Pascal Belanger and Robert Bachart, Winnipeg Airports Authority
Winnipeg Airports Authority (WAA) is a non-share capital corporation responsible for the management and operation of Winnipeg James Armstrong Richardson International Airport, a full-service airport providing passengers and cargo customers access to markets across Canada, the United States, Mexico, and the world. Located at the geographic centre of North America, with round-the-clock operations, Winnipeg James Armstrong Richardson International Airport is the number one dedicated freighter airport in Canada as measured by the number of flights. Our facilities and established air and ground links allow us to serve the many growing trade routes around the world. The airport generates over $3.6 billion in total economic output and welcomes over 3.5 million passengers annually.

12:00p.m.     Lunch is served

Who should attend:

  • Mayors and Reeves
  • Councillors
  • Senior Municipal Staff
  • PMCR partners

Registration details:
Deadline to register is June 6 (limited space available). Cost is $45; includes morning pastries, lunch and parking (find a spot in the airport economy parking lot; we will validate your ticket on site.)

Registration link: https://firstpersonstrategies.wufoo.com/forms/pmcr-event-registration/

About our Supporting Partner, Winnipeg Airports Authority:
Winnipeg Airports Authority Inc. is responsible for the management and operation of Winnipeg Richardson International Airport, a full-service airport providing passengers and cargo clients access to markets across Canada, the United States, Mexico and the world. Located at the geographic centre of North America, with round-the-clock operations, Winnipeg Richardson International Airport is the number one dedicated freighter airport in Canada as measured by the number of flights. The airport generates over $3.6 billion in total economic output and welcomes over 3.5 million passengers annually.

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News

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Regional Growth Strategy to Begin in Manitoba’s Capital Region
Regional Leaders Commitment to Collaboration

For immediate release

Winnipeg, MB, June 25, 2015 - All 16 member municipalities of the Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region(PMCR) have signed an agreement to collaborate in developing a long‐term regional plan that will position Manitoba’s Capital Region as a dynamic and desirable location to invest, live, work and play.

In January 2006, the Manitoba government enacted The Capital Region Partnership Act to formally establish the Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region with a mandate to: create a forum to discuss and develop regional solutions to common issues; promote cooperation in delivering services and developing infrastructure; promote tourism and sustainable economic development; and conduct research and foster public awareness about regional issues.

"The work done to date by the PMCR has established unprecedented levels of trust and collaboration and sets the stage for the development of the Regional Growth Strategy to guide the future of strategic decision‐making for planning and infrastructure investments across the region," said Manitoba Infrastructure and Transportation Minister Steve Ashton on behalf of Municipal Government Minister Drew Caldwell. “Today’s signing of the charter agreement confirms the commitment of members to the priorities, objectives and goals the region has agreed upon and positions the PMCR for great things to come.”

The work undertaken by the 16 municipalities and the Manitoba government will guide development and planning decisions that will ignite Manitoba’s economy and benefit all members and the province as a whole.

"We see from other regions across the Canada and the world that working together on a regional scale is the best way forward, and provides the best outcomes for the long‐term," said Janice Lukes, the City of Winnipeg’s deputy mayor and co‐chair of the PMCR. "The City of Winnipeg, poised to be home to one million residents within the next 20 years, is pleased to be a partner in the development of the Regional Growth Strategy for Manitoba’s Capital Region."

"The signing of the Charter signals that the PMCR will officially begin the hard work of developing a regional vision and strategy for Manitoba’s Capital Region which will serve as a key, guiding document for development in this growing region for the next 25 years," said Colleen Sklar, executive director of the PMCR. "We need to work as a region to ensure we are managing our resources in a sustainable way, protecting our land and water, and building a level of resiliency that will allow us to maintain our prosperity and protect our way of life for today and tomorrow."

"The Regional Growth Strategy is an innovative and ambitious regional planning process that will build on and complement existing local processes while ensuring a regional lens to facilitate the key objectives of the plan," said Bob Gomes, president and chief executive officer of Stantec. "This will ensure sustainability, collaboration, innovation, climate change mitigation and resiliency for Manitoba’s Capital Region as a whole and Stantec is pleased to be part of this exciting project as facilitators."

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Event Details:
Where: 4th Floor, 311 Portage Avenue – Stantec Winnipeg offices
When: 10:30 am, Thursday, June 25, 2015 ‐ Remarks will begin at 10:30 am sharp;

Contacts:
Colleen Sklar ‐ PMCR Executive Director ‐ M. 204.781.7346
Stasa Veroukis ‐ Stantec Marketing and Communications ‐ M. 204.960.215
Caedmon Malowany, Cabinet Communications – O. 204.945.1494

Signatories to the agreement:
Janice Lukes, City of Winnipeg
Frances Smee, RM ofRosser
Bob Bodnaruk, RM of Springfield
Bruce Henley, RM of West St. Paul
Brad Erb, RM of Macdonald
Ken Beerman, City of Selkirk
Dale Fossay, RM of Cartier
Shelley Hart, RM of East St. Paul
Wilf Taillieu, RM of Headingley
Jackie Hunt, RM of Ritchot
Jim Campbell, RM of Rockwood
George Pike, RM of St. Andrews
Debbie Fiebelkorn, RM of St. Clements
Dwayne Clark, RM of St. Francois Xavier
Robert Rivard, RM of Tache
Walter Badger, Town of Stonewall

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Manitoba Not Ready For Climate Change

Source: Manitoba Wildlands - See the Original Release Here

A water security expert says climate change will have dire consequences on Manitoba's infrastructure and consequently its economy, unless something changes. Bob Sandford, EPCOR Water Security Research Chair at United Nations University, began working to help solve water-related climate issues in Manitoba a decade ago. His first focus was on Lake Winnipeg — now his focus is the province's infrastructure.

"You see that there are larger changes to the hydrologic cycle that are causing more frequent flooding, greater storms and causing greater infrastructure damage. We are of the view that this could have serious economic consequences for the province, so our meeting today is about how we deal with those matters,"

Sandford spoke to the Threatened Infrastructure conference Thursday, May 7th, in Winnipeg, hosted by the Manitoba Capital Region.

The 2011 flooding in Manitoba, which damaged homes and displaced hundreds, cost more than $1 Billion to fight, and that does not include massive post-flood damages that are still being tallied. Manitoba needs a plan to mitigate climate change impacts.

View May 7, 2015 CBC News article
View May 17, 2015 CBC News article
View David Suzuki Foundation Economic impacts page
View 2011 NRTEE report

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CERTIFICATION PROGRAM / CONFERENCE ESTABLISH NEW MILESTONES

Manitoba Municipalities Pilot New Solutions for Water Woes.

WINNIPEG - The hydrologic cycle is changing; and government and industry need to get on board to build resiliency into our infrastructure to protect our environment, our economy and our way of life. This is the key message delivered today at the ‘Threatened Infrastructure’ conference at the Metropolitan Theatre, hosted by the Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region.

"This is a remarkable conference, in both its subject matter and in the turnout, clearly showing the level of interest in working toward positive action" said Janice Lukes, Winnipeg City Councillor and CoMChair of the Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region, who, with Frances Smee, Co-Chair welcomed the 165 attendees from government, administration, construction, environmental organizations, business and industry. "The South Basin Mayors and Reeves/ Lake Friendly are partnering in this event so we can begin to translate higher levels of understanding to immediate and long-term action at a regional and municipal level."

The conference featured Robert Sandford, EPCOR Chair for Water Security at the United Nations Institute for Water, Environment and Health, addressing the changing global water cycle and why it matters here. Roger Rempel, Senior Environmental Engineer and Climate Change Adaptation Specialist from Stantec, speaking to Climate Risk for Municipal Infrastructure, Elvio Zaghi and Lourette Swanepoel of Stantec who provided insight into strengthening the sustainability and resiliency of municipal infrastructure, followed by an afternoon panel discussion with some of Winnipeg’s leaders from across sectors all leading up to a working sessions where short and long term action was discussed.

"Local Government are among the key players in addressing water problems here in Manitoba and across the globe, and the innovative response we have seen from these engaged leaders is very encouraging,” said Colleen Sklar who champions both the Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region and the Lake Friendly Program. “The Regional Growth Strategy being undertaken by the PMCR combined with Municipal Best Practices may be our best chance at catching up to and getting ahead of the problem."

Step One Underway

Within the conference, Lake Friendly launched their Manitoba-made, Aquavist Certification Program for Local Government, a collection of actions municipalities can take across a number of areas, with point scores attributed based on the relative effectiveness of each action to reduce nutrient loading, build resiliency, reduce green house gas emissions, and protect natural habitat.

"The water and land use practices these leaders inherited served us pretty well in the past," said Rick Gamble, Chair Lake Friendly. "But rapid growth, new technologies and new realities about the hydrologic cycle and climate change require us to re-think some of our old ways in planning, operations and infrastructure, if we're going to be accountable stewards of water, going forward. I'm very encouraged about what I have seen here today."

Aquavist Certification for Municipalities is a voluntary, continuous improvement program that provides clear action, performance measures and opportunities to share successes. It was developed by a cross-sectoral working group with input from a broad range of stakeholders with support through the Lake Winnipeg Basin Stewardship Fund. James Bezan, MP Selkirk Interlake congratulated the South Basin Mayors and Reeves on establishing the Aquavist program that will help protect Lake Winnipeg.

The Aquavist Certification Program for Municipalities will be followed by similar certifications for businesses and schools. The entire process will be promoted and supported through a public engagement strategy related to water in Manitoba that is being developed with the support of local and national businesses and industries.

Following the conference, Bob Raleigh, CAO, Rockefeller Consulting, NY and Bob Sandford, UN are undertaking a second round of invitation-only meetings with Manitoba business and community leaders to build partnerships with respect to the public engagement campaign.

"LongMterm water protection is emerging as the most significant public policy challenge in the world," said Bob Sandford. “Manitoba has expertise around the science and technological of this issue, and around community building to affect and support change. You can help lead these important conversations, for your waters and because the world will have a lot to gain if you get this right, here."

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The Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region represents 16 municipalities, including and surrounding the City of Winnipeg, who collaborate to: develop a competitive, economically strong Capital Region; build strong civic leadership and strengthen working relationships; create awareness of Capital Region issues and concerns.

Lake Friendly was founded by the South Basin Mayors and Reeves in 2009 in cooperation with Manitoba Conservation and Water Stewardship to build community awareness of the serious issue of deteriorating water quality in the Lake Winnipeg watershed.

Aquavist by Lake Friendly is a public engagement and awareness campaign encouraging business- driven solutions to protecting our water and replicating such approaches in other communities in Canada and abroad.

For more information and to arrange for interviews contact

Colleen Sklar – 204-781-7346
Sherril Matthes – 204-898-6823

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The 2014 Calgary Regional Partnership General Assembly
Discussion Video Featuring Colleen Sklar

The Calgary Regional Partnership (CRP) celebrated 10 years of collaboration and cooperation at its General Assembly in June of this year. The highlight of this event was the signing of "The Calgary Metropolitan Plan” a blueprint for accommodating growth over the next 60 years in the Calgary Region.

The 14 municipal members of the CRP have committed to the CMP by aligning their local plans. And setting out the relationship between the local planning and a regional approach.

The General Assembly also featured a panel discussion on collaboration within and across regions. Colleen Sklar the Executive Director of the Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region participated in the panel discussion and spoke about the Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region as well as the benefits of collaborating as regions.

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Government of Manitoba - Manitobams to Benefit From New Drinking Water Infrastructure Thanks to Government Partnership

Source: Province of Manitoba - See the Original Release Here

Investment Supports Business Growth, Job Creation and Further Infrastructure

RURAL MUNICIPALITY OF ROSSER—The Honourable Shelley Glover, Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages and Member of Parliament for Saint Boniface, and Stan Struthers, Minister of Municipal Government, announced funding toward Phase I of the Cartier Regional Water Co-Operative Expansion Project to serve CentrePort Canada and communities located in the municipalities of Cartier, Grey, Headingley, Portage la Prairie, Rockwood, Rosser and St. François Xavier as well as the Headingley Correctional Centre (HCC).

This project consists of three components including the construction of a new water treatment plant in Headingley that will be designed to accommodate an additional expansion in the future, installation of a pipeline from Headingley to Rosser, and construction of a pump house and a reservoir in Rosser.

Overall, 2,000 existing households will be connected to a treated municipal water supply, as well as the HCC and industries located in CentrePort Canada. The project will also enable the connection of future residential, commercial, agricultural, and industrial developments throughout the region.

Quick Facts

  • The Government of Canada is conditionally setting aside up to 1/3 of eligible costs, to a maximum of $14.5 million for this project.
    • $12.1 million under the New Building Canada Fund’s PTIC-NRP, which is conditional on the project meeting applicable federal eligibility requirements with respect to the New Building Canada Fund and the signing of a contribution agreement.
    • $2.4 million from Correctional Service Canada in support of the future connection of the Stony Mountain Institution.
  • The Government of Manitoba will provide 1/3 of funding up to a maximum of $14.5 million toward total eligible costs for the project under its $5.5-billion, five-year plan to invest in core infrastructure including roads, bridges, clean water projects and flood protection. Independent analysis conducted by the Conference Board of Canada projects Manitoba’s plan will create 58,900 jobs, boost the province’s economy by $6.3 billion and increase exports by $5.4 billion. The Government of Manitoba will also be contributing up to $2.6 million toward the land, pre-design and engineering costs, as well as environmental licensing fees.
  • The Cartier Regional Water Co-Operative Inc. and the municipalities benefiting from the project will provide the final 1/3 of funding. The Cartier Regional Water Co-Op (CRWC) currently provides potable water to rural residents and communities located in the municipalities of Cartier, Grey, Headingley, Portage la Prairie, Rockwood, Rosser, St. François Xavier as well as HCC.

Quotes

"Keeping our communities healthy and safe is one of our Government’s highest priorities. The Cartier Regional Water Co-Operative Expansion Project will help provide access to high-quality, clean water to Manitoba residents for years to come. Our Government’s support for public infrastructure has never been stronger, as we continue to focus on creating jobs, promoting growth, and building strong, prosperous communities across Canada. Approximately $5 billion will flow every year through our new Plan over the next ten years."

The Honourable Shelly Glover
Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages and Member of Parliament for Saint Boniface

 

"Our historic investments in strategic infrastructure are growing our economy and creating good jobs. This project will not only provide safe, clean water to thousands of families, it will also supply businesses at CentrePort Canada taking Manitoba-made products to the world. This is the next major infrastructure project critical in growing the Manitoba economy and will help ensure the further development of CentrePort Canada, the Winnipeg airport and surrounding area as a premiere hub for trade by air, rail and road."

Stan Stuthers
Minister of Municipal Government

 

"CentrePort appreciates the vision of our government partners for coming together and developing a regional solution that will supply water to CentrePort and the capital region. This will help attract new private investment and create jobs at our province’s 20,000-acre tri-modal inland port.”

Diane Gray
President and CEO, CentrePort Canada Inc.

 

Associated Links

To learn more about the New Building Canada Fund –Provincial-Territorial Infrastructure Component –National and Regional Projects, visit: www.infrastructure.gc.ca/plan/nrp-pnr-prog-eng.html.

For additional information on the New Building Canada Plan, visit: www.infrastructure.gc.ca/plan/nbcp-npcc-eng.html.

To learn more about Manitoba’s infrastructure projects, visit www.infrastructure.mb.ca.

To learn more about the Manitoba Government’s plan for strong infrastructure, steady growth and good jobs, visit www.steadygrowth.ca/english/strong-infrastructure/.

To learn more about the Government of Canada’s focus on jobs and the economy, consult Canada’s Economic Action Plan at www.eap.gc.ca.

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Government of Manitoba - Seven Communities to Benefit From Permanent Flood Protection Infrastructure

Source: Province of Manitoba - See the Original Release Here

Federal-provincial funding for these projects made possible thanks to cost savings on the Red River Floodway Expansion Project

West St. Paul, Manitoba—Many Manitoba residents can now look forward to additional safety measures being implemented for their families and properties thanks to today’s announcement of funding for permanent flood protection infrastructure for seven communities across the province.

These communities will benefit from the construction of permanent dikes by upgrading and replacing the temporary diking put in place following the floods of 2011. Communities benefiting from the project include the towns of Souris and Melita (Rural Municipality of Arthur), Duck Bay, Waterhen and the rural municipalities of St. Clements, East St. Paul and West St. Paul.

This funding was previously noted after an agreement was made between the federal and provincial governments to redirect cost savings from the Red River Floodway expansion project towards new flood mitigation projects elsewhere in the province.

Quick Facts

  • The Government of Canada will provide up to $6.75 million through the Building Canada Fund – Major Infrastructure Component.
  • The Province of Manitoba will also contribute up to $6.75 million to the project.
  • The seven municipalities will contribute a combined $1.35 million of the total eligible project cost of $14.85 million.

Quotes

"Our Government is proud to support seven communities in Manitoba in meeting vital infrastructure needs, like here in West St. Paul. We will continue to deliver on our commitment to provide safe, modern infrastructure for all Canadians as we focus on creating jobs, promoting growth, and building strong, prosperous communities in Manitoba and across Canada."

Joy Smith, Member of Parliament for Kildonan–St. Paul

 

"This work builds on the valiant efforts that were made in response to the disastrous flooding of 2011 in these seven communities, by making the existing temporary diking permanent. This flood mitigation project will enhance the safety and quality of life of local residents, especially during flooding season in Manitoba."

James Bezan, Member of Parliament for Selkirk–Interlake

 

"A tremendous unified effort was required across Manitoba to fight the flood of 2011 and these communities responded to that challenge with temporary dikes to protect people and property. We are pleased to join in the funding of the conversion to permanent dikes and enhanced flood fighting capacity."

Steve Ashton, Minister of Infrastructure and Transportation

 

"Cost sharing with our federal and municipal partners gives us more opportunities to help ensure communities are better prepared and protected. We often focus on the large flood management systems in Manitoba, but the upgrading of these dikes is an important step for these communities and represents an investment safety.”

Ron Kostyshyn, Minister of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development

 

"Once again I am very pleased to report back to the community of West St. Paul that our strong collaborative relationship with our federal and provincial partners is again bringing important infrastructure funds back in to our community, that will be spent very wisely on permanent flood protection. Over the years the community has had to deal with sandbagging and annual flood threats that caused negative impacts on the lives of West St. Paul citizens. The citizens of West St. Paul can now carry on with knowing that the different levels of government have ensured their safety during flood events.”

Bruce Henley, Mayor, West St. Paul Associated

 

Links

To learn more about the federal Building Canada Fund—Major Infrastructure Component, visit www.infrastructure.gc.ca/prog/bcf-fcc-eng.html#mic-vgi.

For additional information on the New Building Canada Plan, visit: www.infrastructure.gc.ca/plan/plan-eng.html.

To learn more about Manitoba’s infrastructure projects, please visit www.infrastructure.mb.ca.

To learn more about the Government of Canada's focus on jobs and the economy consult Canada’s Economic Action Plan at http://actionplan.gc.ca/.

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Transporting the Capital Region Forward: Capital Region Transportation Master Plan

Long-term transportation blueprint to strengthen economic investment, sustainable growth in thriving Capital Region

Following two years of community consultation, engineering studies and technical review, the Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region (PMCR) today unveiled its transportation master plan –– a blueprint to further strengthen connectivity, economic development and smart growth in the Capital Region over the next 25 years.

"Manitoba’s Capital Region is the fastest-growing area of the province, and this plan directly reflects the region’s long-term needs," said PMCR Chair Grant Nordman. "The plan will promote new investment and improved transportation options for the growing number of families and businesses who call the Capital Region home."

The transportation master plan includes guiding principles for integrated land use, highway infrastructure, active transportation, transit and the movement of goods by rail, road and air.

The plan directly supports economic development and jobs by ensuring that new transportation infrastructure mirrors emerging and anticipated industrial and commercial growth. The plan will also serve as an economic development resource that can be used by partners such as Winnipeg Airports Authority, CentrePort and Economic Development Winnipeg to attract new investment.

"A centralized long-term transportation plan promotes greater transportation efficiency and smart, sustainable development," said Colleen Sklar, PMCR Executive Director. "Manitoba’s Capital Region is the economic engine of our province, and this plan will shape future transportation investments that allow the region to continue to prosper and increase our competitiveness, as it is no longer individual cities but regions that must compete for investment and plan for sustainable growth."

"An integrated regional transportation plan is vital in order to leverage Manitoba’s competitive advantages and its transportation assets such as the Winnipeg Richardson International Airport,” said Winnipeg Airports Authority Vice-President & Chief Commercial Officer Pascal Belanger. "It is key that we look beyond our immediate area and develop a comprehensive plan that will help connect our various industries with international markets."

The plan will also allow provincial and federal funders to ensure that transportation investments align with identified regional priorities that already have the consensus and support of regional decision-makers.

To guide implementation of the new plan, a working group comprised of representatives from the Province of Manitoba, City of Winnipeg, Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region and regional transportation partners has been formed to ensure a consistent, coordinated regional focus guides transportation investments in the Capital Region. The group will also work with governments to prioritize recommendations, which range from increasing highway capacity on key routes to increasing population density to improving the efficiency of the movement of goods.

The new Capital Region Transportation Master Plan will directly support and align with existing planning resources including the Our Winnipeg Transportation Master Plan adopted by the City of Winnipeg in 2011.

The Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region unites regional leaders around a long-term vision built on the pillars of economic prosperity and good jobs, environmental stewardship and exceptional quality of life. Manitoba’s growing Capital Region represents two-thirds of the provincial population and over 70 percent of the Manitoba GDP.

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Government of Manitoba - Province Announces Major Highway Improvements Along PTH 59

Source: Province of Manitoba - See the Original Release Here

Design Work to Begin Immediately on North Perimeter Interchange: Premier Selinger

The Manitoba government will invest hundreds of millions of dollars in repairs and upgrades along PTH 59 including immediately undertaking design work on the PTH 59 and PTH 101 interchange, major paving projects and bridge rehabilitation, Premier Greg Selinger announced today.

"PTH 59 is a heavily travelled north-south tourist and trade route, and these road investments will improve the ride for heavy trucks and commuters,” Premier Selinger said. "The new projects include bridge replacements and paving of this roadway to Birds Hill and the east side beach communities of Lake Winnipeg."

Approximately $160 million was initially budgeted for PTH 59 work over the next five years, but even more will be allocated to PTH 59 with the completion of the PTH 59/PTH 101 interchange in the five-year period, the premier said. The project will see design and tendering take place over this year, with planned construction beginning in the fall of 2015 and completed over a three-year period, he said, adding the size of the interchange project is similar to CentrePort Canada Way and will be constructed along much the same timelines.

Additional work on PTH 59 this year includes:

  • paving 23 km of bituminous pavement from the south junction of PTH 12 (north of the Brokenhead Ojibway Nation) to PTH 11;
  • microsurfacing six km north of PR 305;
  • microsurfacing six km near St. Malo;
  • laying nine km of chip seal from PTH 11 to Victoria Beach;
  • and working on 23 km of road shoulders from Rat River to PTH 52.

The premier said in addition, the following two projects are planned in future years on PTH 59:

  • providing structure rehabilitation at the Red River Floodway, near Birds Hill; and
  • providing 22 km of grade widening, base and bituminous pavement from PR 317 to the south junction of PTH 12.

The premier noted an active transportation overpass at the northeast Perimeter Highway and Raleigh Street/Gateway Road will also be built in conjunction with structures at the northeast Perimeter Highway and PTH 59 interchange, in order to connect the northeast Pioneers Greenway with the Duff Roblin Parkway Trail and Birds Hill Park.

The projects are part of the Manitoba government’s $5.5-billion Five-year Plan to Build a Stronger Manitoba. The premier said funds raised from the one-cent-on-the-dollar increase in the PST will be dedicated to new investments in core infrastructure including:

  • investing more than $3.7 billion in Manitoba roads, highways and bridges to better connect communities and strengthen trade corridors;
  • investing $320 million flood in protection around the province to better protect more communities from flooding; and
  • investing more than $1.5 billion in municipal roads, clean water and other municipal infrastructure to help meet the needs of Manitoba’s many growing communities.

Motorists are reminded to slow down and use caution approaching and in construction zones, for their own safety and the safety of workers. The latest information on lane closures and road conditions is available anytime at 511 (toll-free), at www.mb511.ca or by following the Twitter account at www.twitter.com/MBGovRoads.

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Questions & Answers: Request for Proposals - Regional Growth Strategy

Answers to questions received regarding the Request for Proposals - Regional Growth Strategy, closing date May 30, 2014 have been posted here:

>> Questions and Answers

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Request for Proposals: Regional Growth Strategy

Regional Growth Strategy for Manitoba’s Capital Region
Investing strategically in regional infrastructure and services

The Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region (PMCR) is issuing a Request for Proposals for the preparation of a Regional Growth Strategy.

The Regional Growth Strategy will set the stage for infrastructure investment and development planning over the year 2035 driven by economic opportunities and population growth.

The RFP is intended to solicit meaningful responses from qualified consultants or consulting teams with proven expertise in long-range land use and infrastructure planning.

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AGM Sponsorships SOLD OUT

AGM Sponsorships are now SOLD OUT.

Thanks very much to our generous partners and sponsors for their support!

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RM of Brokenhead joins Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region

The RM of Brokenhead has elected to join the Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region (PMCR), the organization that represents capital-region municipalities on shared opportunities and challenges from economic development to water protection.

"Today the Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region grows even stronger as we welcome the RM of Brokenhead as our 17th member municipality,” said PMCR executive director Colleen Sklar.

"Brokenhead joins an organization of dedicated leaders with a shared vision for a sustainable, healthy and prosperous capital region.”

Officials from the RM of Brokenhead –– a municipality north-east of Winnipeg that includes the towns of Tyndall and Garson –– said joining the PMCR would ensure the RM had a strong voice on issues common to all capital-region municipalities, which together represent the fastest-growing area in the province.

"Working together as a region on issues that effect us all is an opportunity for us to build a stronger, prosperous and sustainable capital region,” said PMCR Chair and City of Winnipeg Councillor Grant Nordman.

Manitoba’s capital region is home to two-thirds of the province’s population. Economic activity in the region represents 70 percent of the provincial GDP.

The Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region unites political leaders and senior officials around shared regional priorities, with a focus on the creation of a collaborative sustainable regional growth strategy, protecting our agricultural lands and water, transportation and infrastructure, jobs and the regional economy.

Recent PMCR activity has included:

  • A sold-out conference on sustainable development, water stewardship and environmentally responsible practices, attended by over 100 regional leaders and decision-makers.
  • PMCR-hosted meetings in Winnipeg with 14 water-technology experts and researchers from the Netherlands, as part of a wider commitment to share innovations around water protection and management in the Capital Region.
  • Development of a Transportation Master Plan, to be released later this spring, which responds to demographic, business and environmental trends to guide transportation infrastructure in the capital region over the next 25 years.

Additional detail on the PMCR’s long-term priorities is available on the PMCR website: www.leadingmanitoba.ca

For more information: Colleen Sklar, Executive Director, Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region, 204-989-2048

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Government of Manitoba - Manitoba Government Announces Five-Year Plan to Build Core Infrastructure, Create 58,900 Jobs For Families

Source: Province of Manitoba - See the Original Release Here

A new $5.5-billion, five-year plan will focus on building Manitoba's core infrastructure priorities and create more than 58,900 jobs, Infrastructure and Transportation Minister Steve Ashton and Jobs and the Economy Minister Theresa Oswald announced today.

"In past decades, economic uncertainty brought cuts and there was not enough infrastructure investment to keep up the aging roads, highways, bridges and flood protection that Manitobans rely on," said Minister Ashton. "We are making this historic investment because we know restoring and expanding our infrastructure is actually even more important during economic uncertainty. These investments keep our businesses competitive and create good jobs for families."

The Five-Year Plan to Build a Stronger Manitoba will use every dollar raised from the one-cent-on-the-dollar increase in the PST with new investments in core infrastructure including:

  • more than $3.7 billion will be invested in Manitoba roads, highways and bridges to better connect communities and strengthen trade corridors;
  • $320 million will be invested in flood protection around the province to better protect more communities from flooding;
  • and more than $1.5 billion will be invested in municipal roads, clean water and other municipal infrastructure to help meet the needs of Manitoba’s many growing communities.

"For every dollar that we invest in our plan, we will see an even bigger boost to our economy,” said Minister Oswald. "We’re also investing in training in the trades and in apprenticeships to ensure that Manitobans have the skills that industry needs in order to fill the tens of thousands of jobs our plan is creating. We’re focused on providing opportunities for young people so they can build their futures right here at home."

Highlights from an independent analysis conducted by the Conference Board of Canada and released today projects that Manitoba’s $5.5-billion investment in core infrastructure will:

  • boost Manitoba’s economy by $6.3 billion,
  • boost exports by $5.4 billion,
  • and boost retail sales by $1.4 billion.

The Conference Board of Canada also estimates these investments will create 58,900 jobs and that each dollar invested in the five-year plan will benefit Manitoba’s economy by $1.16.

The five-year plan is the product of many consultations with municipalities, business and labour leaders and industry associations across Manitoba, the ministers noted.

"To keep Manitoba competitive and build our core infrastructure, we all have a part to play, that’s why this plan is so important," said Chris Lorenc, president of the Manitoba Heavy Construction Association. "We have to get started. We have to plan ahead to get the most for our dollar and when there are delays, we have to work together to carry those resources forward and get the job done."

"The five-year plan released today is very important to the continued development of CentrePort Canada as it focuses public investment in two key areas – building Manitoba's economic infrastructure and building our key trade gateways and corridors," said Diane Gray, president and CEO of CentrePort Canada Inc.

Progress on the five-year plan, as well as its economic impacts, will be independently reviewed and publicly reported annually, the ministers added.

The five-year plan can be found at www.gov.mb.ca/mit/pdf/five-yr-plan.pdf.

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Government of Manitoba - Manitoba Building and Renewal Plan Invests in High Priority Road Projects in the Interlake

Source: Province of Manitoba - See the Original Release Here

Province Providing $1 Million for Local Road Projects: Lemieux

The provincial government is investing in roads in Manitoba’s Interlake to ensure families are provided with safe, reliable, well maintained roads on which to travel, Local Government Minister Ron Lemieux announced today

The Municipal Road Improvement Program allows municipalities to address their specific road infrastructure needs by providing them with funds to fix or maintain roads that are a priority for their community," said Lemieux. "Improving key routes helps maintain traffic flow and access to neighbourhoods, and sustain the business links that keep communities vibrant. We are pleased to contribute to this process."

The province is providing funding to the City of Selkirk for three projects that will see road renewal on Queen Avenue, road paving on Greenwood Avenue and road renewal on Sophia Street.

The work will be done with provincial grants under the Municipal Road Improvement Program, which is designed to help municipalities make repairs and upgrades to local roads that are a high priority, the minister said.

Roadwork in the Interlake this year includes:

  • Town of Arborg – reconstruction of 520 metres of Sunset Boulevard;
  • RM of Armstrong – rehabilitation of 1.6 kilometres of Road 110;
  • RM of Bifrost – rehabilitation of 2.2 km of Riverton 20E to PTH 6;
  • RM of Coldwell – rehabilitation of 1.6 km of Road 25W;
  • RM of Eriksdale – extension for 400 m of the existing paved Swan Lake Drive;
  • RM of Fisher – renewal of 1.5 km of N32-23-1W;
  • RM of Gimli – renewal of 2.4 km of Colville Drive and Third Avenue;
  • RM of Gimli – new construction of 400 m of Pearson Avenue;
  • RM of Gimli – new construction of 240 m of Quintal Avenue;
  • Village of Riverton – rehabilitation, excavation and asphalting of 250 m of William Avenue;
  • RM of Rosser – renewal of 13 km of Road 1E;
  • City of Selkirk – renewal and asphalting of 100 m of Sophia Street;
  • City of Selkirk – renewal and asphalting of 300 m of Queen Avenue;
  • City of Selkirk – paving of 190 m of Greenwood Avenue;
  • RM of St. Andrews – micro-surfacing of 4.8 km of Clandeboye Road;
  • RM of St. Andrews – micro-surfacing of 4.8 km of Petersfield Road;
  • RM of St. Francois Xavier – rehabilitation of boundary road; pulling, rebuilding and re-establishing the crown on 6.4 km of Jubilee Road/Road 72N;
  • RM of Woodlands – rehabilitation of boundary road; pulling, rebuilding and re-establishing the crown on 6.4 km of Jubilee Rd/Road 72N;
  • RM of St. Laurent – asphalting of 580 mof St. Laurent Drive;
  • Town of Teulon – 150-m extension of Fifth Avenue SE and Bigway Lane;
  • RM of West St. Paul – rehabilitation of 400 m of Northumberland Road;
  • Town of Winnipeg Beach – rehabilitation of 2.74 km of Prospect Street; and
  • RM of Woodlands – preparation of base and asphalt paving on 90 m of MacDonald Avenue at Collegiate Street.

"Families in the Interlake know the importance of having well-maintained roads, which are vital for safety. These new projects will also help our economy by creating new jobs," said Greg Dewar, MLA, Selkirk, who appeared at an event in Selkirk today on behalf of Lemieux.

"The Association of Manitoba Municipalities is pleased that funds are going toward the local roads that affect our lives each and every day. The need for dedicated municipal infrastructure funding has never been greater," said Doug Dobrowolski, president of the association.

Improvements to roads are part of Manitoba’s $1.8-billion Building and Renewal Plan to meet the province’s critical infrastructure needs including flood protection, municipal projects, health centres, schools and roads.

The Building and Renewal Plan will improve Manitoba roads while stimulating the economy and creating thousands of jobs across the province.

Motorists are reminded to slow down and use caution approaching and in construction zones for their own safety and the safety of workers.

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City of Winnipeg - City of Winnipeg and Rural Municipality of West St. Paul Enter Into First-of-its-Kind Sewer Service Sharing Agreement

Source: City of Winnipeg - See the Original Release Here

Agreement provides additional revenues to the City and a cost-effective sustainable wastewater plan for the municipality

Winnipeg, MB ‒ The City of Winnipeg has entered into a service sharing agreement with West St. Paul that will allow wastewater from the Rural Municipality to be treated at the City’s North End sewage treatment plant. This is the first time the City of Winnipeg has partnered with a neighbouring community for sewage collection and treatment.

The agreement, signed earlier this month, is a win-win for residents of both communities. Winnipeg residents benefit through increased sewer revenues and revenue sharing and West St. Paul residents will have a viable solution for a sustainable wastewater plan.

"This gives us new revenue to invest in the City’s sewer infrastructure and direct revenue sharing into our Regional Roads Capital budget, says Deepak Joshi, City of Winnipeg's Chief Operating Officer. "We have the capacity within our existing sewer infrastructure and treatment facility to assist a neighbouring community and this innovative partnership paves the way for future agreements with other neighbouring municipalities."

"West St. Paul is very fortunate to get the opportunity to partner with the City Of Winnipeg," says Brent Olynyk, Chief Administrative Officer of the Rural Municipality of West St. Paul. "The vision and cooperation of both West St. Paul and City of Winnipeg Councils allows us to move forward to provide an essential service that will sustain our community in the long term. With the assistance of our provincial and federal partners, we are able to take a huge step forward in helping protect the Red River and Lake Winnipeg."

The existing wastewater management system in the Rural Municipality of West St. Paul is faced with many challenges, including:

  • difficulty meeting evolving environmental regulations with existing sewage treatment facilities,
  • an increase in failing septic fields,
  • provincial regulations in the Red River Corridor prohibiting the installation of new on-site septic fields and requiring existing septic fields to be decommissioned and replaced with holding tanks.

The West St. Paul Wastewater Project is comprised of multiple phases. Phase 1 is a $16 million project to install a gravity main trunk sewer pipe to connect to Winnipeg’s existing sewer system and ultimately to the City’s North End sewage treatment plant. Future phases of the project will also benefit neighbouring municipalities.

The Municipality secured initial funding of $10 million made up of an $8 million joint investment from the Government of Canada and Province of Manitoba through the Building Canada Fund – Communities Component program, and $2 million from the Manitoba Water Services Board.

Wastewater could begin flowing to the City’s North End sewage treatment plant as early as 2014. The Municipality will owe the following fees to the City of Winnipeg:

  • the current sewer rate (the same rate charged to Winnipeg sewer ratepayers),
  • a one-time connection charge, and
  • an annual participation fee.

In December 2005, Winnipeg City Council directed the Chief Administrative Officer to identify inter-municipal service sharing opportunities through an Expression of Interest process, and that the following five principles be used to guide the process, to ensure that service sharing agreements:

  • are government to government;
  • are consistent with the City's existing and future capacity to provide the service;
  • are founded on a strong business case to ensure the efficient delivery of the service in the region;
  • incorporate a joint planning agreement to manage development and related environmental concerns; and
  • include a provision for tax/revenue sharing.

Particularly since 2005, steps have been taken towards strengthening cooperation among the Capital Region municipalities, including more effort on communication and establishing relationships, and support toward regional service sharing as well as joint land use planning. This direction aligns with the Our Winnipeg Plan and the Complete Communities strategy document approved by Council.

The Rural Municipality of West St. Paul is inviting their residents to attend an open house on Tuesday, February 19, 2013, and Tuesday, March 5, 2013, from 4:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at the Sunova Centre, 48 Holland Road. More detailed project information is available on the West St. Paul website.

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The Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region

The Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region has been meeting together since 1999 to: work together to develop a competitive, economically strong Capital Region;build strong civic leadership in the Capital Region and strengthen working relationships;create awareness of Capital Region issues and concerns; and resolve issues.

The Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region is committed to a relationship of cooperation founded in communication, mutual understanding, trust and respect. We believe that through collaboration, the Capital Region as a whole can be greater than the sum of its parts, and an model of regional cooperation and planning.

Our Partnership provides the opportunity for Capital Region municipalities to discuss and work on issues that cross their respective boundaries. It supports a flexible approach that recognizes that different issues may involve different stakeholders and different regional processes.

The Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region is supportive of the many regional and inter-municipal initiatives that currently exist in the Manitoba Capital Region. It recognizes and supports the autonomy of local government to develop and implement inter-municipal agreements. The organization also recognizes local government autonomy to deal with other governments and stakeholders directly.

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The following is the Vision Statement for the Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region:

"A safe, healthy, efficient, prosperous and strong Capital Region with a strong Capital City, where the public, governments, and organizations work together cooperatively, enhancing community development opportunities, effectively managing resources, and providing all citizens with a high quality of life."

For more information you can download a copy of our Memorandum of Understanding by clicking this link.

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Board Members

WMCRP Board consists of community representatives from throughout the Winnipeg region. The board meets frequently to receive reports from management, review the operations of the organization, and consider projects and initiatives for the betterment of the region.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
RM of Rosser - Reeve Frances Smee
RM of Macdonald - Reeve Bradley Erb
City of Winnipeg - Councillor Janice Lukes
RM of West St. Paul - Mayor Bruce Henley
RM of Springfield - Reeve Bob Bodnaruk

BOARD MEMBERS
City of Winnipeg - Councillor Scott Gillingham
RM of St. Clements - Mayor Debbie Fiebelkorn
RM of St. Andrews - Mayor George Pike
RM of Rockwood - Reeve Jim Campbell
RM of Tache - Mayor Robert Rivard
City of Selkirk - Mayor Larry Johannson
RM of East St. Paul - Mayor Shelley Hart
RM of Ritchot - Mayor Jackie Hunt
RM of Headingley - Mayor Wilfred Taillieu
Town of Stonewall - Mayor Lockie McLean
RM of Cartier - Reeve Dale Fossay
RM of St. Francois Xavier - Reeve Dwayne Clark
RM of Brokenhead - Reeve Brad Saluk

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Community Profiles

Below is a map outlining the rural municipalities and communities of the Manitoba Capital Region. Click on any of the links to your left to view a region's community profile.

Community Profiles
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RM of Cartier

Population: 3,153
Land Area: 553km2
Planning District: White Horse Plains Planning District

Features

History

  • The Rural Municipality of Cartier was incorporated in 1914.
  • A reeve and five ward councillors represent represent the RM.
  • The RM offices are located in the town of Elie.
  • Has recently become a full member of the Partnership for the Manitoba Capital Region.

Geography

  • The RM of Cartier is located west of the RM of Headingley, and is directly south of the Assiniboine River.
  • It is composed largely of gleysol and black chernozoic soil.
  • The large majority of land in this RM is Class 1,2 or 3 according to the Canada Lands Inventory.

Economic Activity

  • Agriculture and other primary industries are the major employment sectors in the RM.
  • Cartier has a lower unemployment rate compared to the provincial average (3.4% vs. 5.5% Statistics Canada).
  • The town of Elie has a key economic location along the Trans- Canada Highway.
  • Average income and house prices in Cartier are above Manitoba average (Statistics Canada).

Settlement Composition

  • The major settlement centre in the RM of Cartier is the unincorporated town of Elie with a population of 562 (Statistics Canada, Census 2011).
  • There are also a number of smaller settlement centres, St. Eustache, Dacotah and Springstein.
  • According to the White Horse Plains Planning District Development Plan, Elie as well as the other settlement centres will be the focus for most residential and non-resource based land uses.
  • There are 765 occupied private dwellings in the RM.

Infrastructure Services

  • The RM of Cartier draws the majority of its water from the Assiniboine River at the Cartier Regional Water Co-op plant in St. Eustache.
  • The Cartier Regional Water Co-op services the RM of Cartier, the RM of St. François Xavier, the RM of Headingley, the RM of Rosser, the RM of Rockwood and other RM’s further west.
  • In most settlement centres, waste infrastructure exists in the form of gravity fed waste lagoons.
  • There is a recycling program operating in the RM, as well as a landfill.
  • The Trans-Canada Highway passes directly through Cartier.

Development Activity

  • Planning District Plan: White Horse Plains Planning District Development Plan
  • Adopted on April 6th, 2010.
  • Incorporates both the RM of Cartier and the RM of St. François Xavier.
  • Aligned closely with the Manitoba Planning Act.
  • Sets out basic planning directions and processes.
  • Development to be focused in settlement centres within the RM.
  • Prepared by Landmark Planning/Design and MB Dept. of Local Government.

Regional Assets

  • The Trans-Canada Highway and Canadian National Railway pass through the RM of Cartier.
  • The Assiniboine River is an important natural regional asset.
  • There are dikes along the banks of the Assiniboine River.
  • Beaudry Provincial Park is located along the Assiniboine River.
  • Amenities in the town of Elie likely have a regional significance for the rural population within its catchment area.
  • The Cartier Regional Water Co-op
  • Part of the La Salle Redboine Conservation District (MB Water Stewardship).

Regional Challenges

  • Challenges may arise for the RM of Cartier due to the agricultural nature of the land if future developments are not properly located in areas suitable for settlement or commercial/industrial developments.
  • Infrastructure challenges in providing water and especially waste water services to different areas of the RM.

Visit community website: www.rm-cartier.mb.ca

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RM of East St. Paul

Population: 9,046
Land Area: 42km2
Planning District: N/A

Features

History

  • The Rural Municipality of East St. Paul was incorporated in 1916.
  • Predecessor RM of St. Paul was established in 1880.
  • The RM is represented by a mayor and 4 councilors.
  • Office is located in Birds Hill.
  • East St. Paul has its own planning department.

Geography

  • East St. Paul is located north east of and adjacent to the City of Winnipeg.
  • Smallest RM in Capital Region

Economic Activity

  • Average income and housing prices are higher in East St. Paul than the Manitoba average (Statistics Canada, 2006).
  • The unemployment rate of 4.6% is lower than the provincial average of 5.5% (Statistics Canada, 2006).
  • The RM of East St. Paul is a prominent employer (35 are local residents).
  • River East School Division and Canadian Guide Rail Corporation are also large employers in the area (PMCR website).
  • Other places of work include Esso, Sobeys and Ludwick’s Catering (PMCR website).
  • The top 4 industries in East St. Paul are retail trade, health care & social assistance, construction, and public administration (Statistics Canada, 2006).
  • East St. Paul is looking to develop an economic development plan with the Manitoba Capital Region (East St. Paul Development Plan, 2007).

Settlement Composition

  • There are approximately 2944 total dwellings in East St. Paul (Statistics Canada, 2006), 2905 privately occupied.
  • Population density 207.4/km2
  • Birds Hill is the largest settlement centre.
  • Other centres of development activity are River East Estates, Whidbey Harbour and Pritchard Farm Estates

Infrastructure Services

  • East St. Paul has their own sewage treatment plan; over 2/3 of residences are connected (RM of East St. Paul website).
  • Other residences use private sewage treatment options.
  • East St. Paul has its own landfill.
  • East St. Paul also has a successful compost program: the site was expanded in 2005 with financial assistance from a Waste Reduction Pollution Prevention Fund grant (RM of East St. Paul website). • The RM provides weekly garbage/recycling pick-up services.
  • The East St. Paul Development Plan has expressed municipal concerns about water supply and land drainage.

Development Activity

  • Development Plan: East St. Paul Development Plan (2007)
  • Original development plan put into place in 1994.
  • Produced by Landmark Planning & Design in conjunction with East St. Paul planning staff and the East St. Paul Planning Advisory Committee.
  • 60 new housing starts in the last few years.
  • Commercial development concentrated in existing sites.
  • Promote sustainable development, identify growth factors and review issues and opportunities.
  • 21 single family housing starts in 2006 compared to 49 in 2005 – this could be attributed to the development of a 55+ seniors housing complex north of Birds Hill.
  • The RM would like to work with the Capital Region and has outlined some common interests.

Regional Assets

  • A 63 acre recently developed recreation centre could be utilized by surrounding municipalities in the region.
  • Red River Floodway and Floodway expansion, landscaping and recreation plan, inter-regional participation.
  • RM is connected to other municipalities and the City of Winnipeg by three highways.
  • Although not a regional asset, East St. Paul’s model for composting could be adapted and utilized in other rural municipalities, especially those looking to develop sustainable practices. Regional Challenges
  • The RM appears to be looking for new economic development opportunities.
  • East St. Paul has expressed concerns about being insular and isolated from other RM’s.

Visit community website: www.eaststpaul.com

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RM of Headingley

Population: 3,215
Land Area: 107km2
Planning District: N/A

Features

History

  • From 1972 to 1993 Headingley was part of the City of Winnipeg.
  • Ceding from Winnipeg in 1993.
  • Headingley is represented by a reeve and 4 councillors.

Geography

  • The RM runs 9 km along both sides of the Assiniboine River (excluding Assiniboia Downs) and contains 8 km of the TransCanada Highway (Christiansen, 2006).
  • 78% of the land use is designated for agricultural use (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 1999).

Economic Activity

  • Agriculture is the primary land use: the industry employs 4.1% of the total labour force (Statistics Canada, 2006).
  • 92% of working residents are employed outside of the RM (Statistics Canada, 2006).
  • The median income in Headingley is higher than the provincial average (Statistics Canada, 2006).
  • Headingley has a low residential tax rate and no business tax rate in an attempt to draw commercial and industrial business (RM of Headingley website).

Settlement Composition

  • Two urban areas: Headingley and Headingley South.
  • Sections of both sides of the TransCanada Highway have been zoned for ‘highway commercial’ development to create a suitable source of revenue for the RM.
  • Private dwellings: 936 (Statistics Canada, 2011).

Infrastructure Services

  • The RM offers garbage and recycling pick-up privately contracted through N49.
  • Headingley purchases water from the Cartier Water Co-op and distributes it from a pumping station to the reservoir located in the RM (RM of Headingley website).
  • Headingley’s new sewage treatment plant began operations in July 2011 (RM of Headingley website).

Population

  • Headingley’s population doubled from 1996 – 2006, making it the fastest growing RM in the MCR.
  • The differences in population can be attributed to the population of the jail within Headingley.

Development Activity

  • Zoning By-Law (September, 2011) – Landmark Planning and Design Inc.
  • Development Plan (2006) – Landmark Planning and Design
  • Development to take place in or near existing urban areas.
  • Commercial/industrial zoning is concentrated around the Trans-Canada Highway and the new business park
  • Headingley is not a member of a planning district.
  • Landmark Planning and Design conducted residential supply and demand studies

Regional Assets

  • Correctional facilities: 170 capacity maximum security women’s institute will be completed in 2012 (Akman Construction, 2011), a 485 capacity security prison
  • Recreational facilities: Thunder Rapids Fun Park, Adrenaline Adventures, the John Blumberg Softball Complex, and both golf courses are all regional recreational facilities
  • Headingley Business Park: opened in 2008 and is located northeast of the hamlet of Headingley (InvestHeadingley. com, 2010).

Regional Challenges

  • Planning for the continued growth of Headingley: determining where/if continued development should occur.
  • Flooding continues to be an issue
  • The Cartier Water Co-op, which serves seven municipalities in total, is both a challenge and opportunity for continued correspondence and future collaboration.

Visit community website: www.rmofheadingley.ca

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RM of Macdonald

Population: 6,280
Land Area: 1,157km2
Planning District: Macdonald-Ritchot Planning District

Features

History

  • Incorporated in 1881.
  • Represented by a reeve and 7 ward councillors.
  • RM office located in Sanford.

Geography

  • Rural farmland is the primary land use.
  • The La Salle River winds through the municipality.
  • Prone to flooding.

Economic Activity

  • Agriculture and natural resource industries are the highest employment sectors (Statistics Canada, 2006).
  • Current development plan outlines future business/industrial parks referred to as "enterprise centres" in Oak Bluff and McGillivray Business Park (Lombard North, 2011).
  • Median family income of Macdonald census is $84 529 (Statistics Canada, 2006).
  • The RM of Macdonald offers no business tax.
  • Member of Community Futures Triple R, a community economic development corporation of Southern Manitoba Municipalities (Triple R, 2011).

Settlement Composition

  • Urban centres: La Salle, Oak Bluff, Sanford and Starbuck.
  • Rural centres: Domain and Brunkild.
  • Total private dwellings: 1878 (Statistics Canada, 2006).
  • Population density: 5.4km2
  • 98.3% of dwelling units are single detached homes (Statistics Canada, 2006)
  • La Salle is the most populated urban centre in Macdonald at approximately 1400 residents (RM of Macdonald)

Infrastructure Services

  • Drinking water drawn from the La Salle River dam reservoir.
  • Water is treated at the Sanford treatment plant by chlorination and UV treatments (RM of Macdonald).
  • Municipal waste disposal sites are located in Sanford and Starbuck (RM of Macdonald), but no pick-up service.
  • Recyclables are accepted free of charge at municipal waste disposal sites and pick-up is provided in urban centres.
  • Low pressure sewer and gravity systems and sewage lagoons are used throughout Macdonald (Raine, 2012).
  • The municipality provides an annual septic tank pumping service for locations connected to low pressure sewer (Raine, 2012).

Development Activity

  • Development Plan: A Framework for Sustainable Development to 2030
  • Effective September 7, 2011
  • Develop urban centres into "complete communities" (Lombard North, 2011)
  • "Promote compact development" (Lombard North, 2011,p.6)
  • "Protect agricultural and natural resource land" (Lombard North, 2011, p.6)
  • Promote collaboration in capital region planning efforts (Lombard North, 2011)
  • Maintains an overall goal of improving regional sustainability
  • Previous Development Plan: The Macdonald-Ritchot Planning District Development Plan (January, 2003)
  • Other Relevant Planning documents: La Salle River Integrated Watershed Management Plan (Draft, 2010)
  • Partnering RM’s: Cartier, Grey, Portage La Prairie, Ritchot, Macdonald, South Norfolk

Regional Assets

  • A member of the Macdonald-Headingley Recreation District that provides recreational programming and resources on a regional scale (MHRD, 2012)
  • Envisioned commercial and industrial development is supported by proximity to Winnipeg (RM of Macdonald)
  • Roadway access provided by highways #3, #2, provincial road 330 and perimeter highway #101 (RM of Macdonald)
  • Has access to major railroad lines (RM of Macdonald)

Regional Challenges

  • Flood preparation, mitigation and adaptation
  • Ensuring water quality given intensive agricultural activity
  • Ensuring adequate water supply
  • Ensuring smart urban growth to preserve agricultural land base

Visit community website: www.rmofmacdonald.com

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RM of Ritchot

Population: 5,478
Land Area: 334km2
Planning District: Macdonald-Ritchot Planning District

Features

History

  • Incorporated in 1890 (RM of Ritchot website).
  • The RM is represented by a mayor and 4 councillors.
  • RM office located in St. Adolphe.

Geography

  • Located along the Red River, south of Winnipeg.
  • The area is dominated by the Red River Valley, low lying land in a floodplain and rolling first step setting.

Economic Activity

  • Retail & services are the largest employment sectors.
  • Industrial, business and retail services are all provided within the region.
  • Construction is another key component of the region, as well as manufacturing and agriculture (Statistics Canada, 2010).
  • Enterprise Centre: Ste. Agathe, Maindu / Grande Pointe (Lombard North Group, August 2011).

Settlement Composition

  • The majority of the population resides in the four urban centres of: St. Adolphe, Ste. Agathe, Île-des-Chènes, Grande Pointe (RM of Ritchot website).
  • Traditional river lot settlement pattern.
  • Standard mile section farm lots are located outside of the urban centres.
  • Dwellings are almost entirely single family detached located in and around the urban centres (City Data, 2010).
  • There are dikes that surround each of the urban centres (RM of Ritchot website).

Infrastructure Services

  • The community’s landfill is located south of Leclaire Road, north of Twin Creek Road (RM of Ritchot website).
  • Has both garbage and recycling curbside pickup (RM of Ritchot website).
  • The RM has a water treatment plant, three utility pump houses and two well sites. (RM of Ritchot website).

Development Activity

  • Development Plan: Priority in the plan is for flood mitigation, Dikes, Pumps, Enterprise Centers and planning regionally in the future.
  • No secondary plan yet.

Regional Assets

  • Duff Roblin park is getting redeveloped (Manitoba Conservation, 2009).
  • Provincial Highways PTH 59, PTH 75, and PR 200 are major transportation corridors.

Regional Challenges

  • Flooding is the primary concern for the community (RM of Ritchot website).

Visit community website: www.ritchot.com

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RM of Rockwood

Population: 7,964
Land Area: 1,200km2
Planning District: South Interlake Planning District

Features

History

  • Rockwood was incorporated in 1880.
  • Municipal offices are located in Stonewall.

Geography

  • The RM of Rockwood is located about 16 km north of the Perimeter Highway.
  • Low soil drainages are distributed in the northeast of Rockwood and the entire terrain is flat and low slope.
  • Marsh and organic soils are found in the northeast of Rockwood.
  • The RM of Rockwood is the largest municipality in the Capital Region.
  • 55% of land in Rockwood is used for agriculture.

Economic Activity

  • Until the 1960s, the main industry of the Municipality and Stonewall was limestone quarries, and Rockwood still has several active quarry operations.
  • The main industries of Rockwood are agriculture and other resource-based industries (14.4%), business services (18.8%), and other services (18.9%).
  • The main occupations of Rockwood are trades (22.2%), sales and service (18.1%), and business (16.4%) (Statistics Canada, 2006).
  • 77.8% of the employed population works outside the municipality.
  • Median income and housing prices in Rockwood are above the Manitoba average.

Settlement Composition

  • The RM of Rockwood incorporates six urban centres: Argyle, Balmoral, Gunton, Komarno, Grosse Isle, and Stony Mountain.
  • Total private dwellings in Rockwood are 2,450.
  • 92% of the main dwellings are single-detached homes (Statistics Canada, 2006).

Infrastructure Services

  • Balmoral, Gunton, Grosse Isle, and Stony Mountain are connected to a municipal sewage & water utility system.
  • The area has two waste transfer stations (Windfield Road and Balmoral) and three waste disposal grounds (Teulon, Komarno, and Argyle).
  • The RM of Rockwood is involved in the Interlake Development Corporation.
  • The RM of Rockwood has agreements regarding a sewage lagoon with the Town of Stonewall.

Development Activity

  • Development Plan: South Interlake Planning District Development Plan:
  • The RM of Rockwood cooperates with the RM of Rosser, the Towns of Teulon and Stonewall.
  • The South Interlake Planning District was formed in February 1979.
  • Management Plan: Netley-Grassmere Integrated Watershed Management Plan.
  • The RM of Rockwood is involved in East Interlake Conservation District (EICD).
  • The goals are to improve and to protect the quality of water, and to maintain a healthy watershed.
  • Rockwood has partnership with province of Manitoba and the RM of Armstrong to alleviate flooding concerns along the Chic Canal.
  • RM of Rockwood, Community of Gunton, Water Distribution and Sewer Collection System. (Federal Gov’t Partnership).
  • Regional water supply and distribution system.

Regional Assets

  • Biodiversity such as Oak Hammock Marsh and beds of limestone.
  • High quality deposits of limestone which is critical to supplying building material to the Capital Region.
  • Heritage resources such as the Prime Meridian Trail in Grosse Isle and the Canadian Pacific Railway (1898) in Balmoral.

Regional Challenges

  • Drainage and flooding problems.
  • High water levels in Crescent Lake.
  • Challenges with water crossing municipal boundaries.

Visit community website: www.rockwood.ca

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RM of Rosser

Population: 1,352
Land Area: 441km2
Planning District: South Interlake Planning District

Features

History

  • Incorporated in 1893.
  • The RM is represented by a reeve and 4 councillors.
  • RM office located in Rosser.

Geography

  • Located adjacent to and northwest of the City of Winnipeg.
  • A large portion of the region (418.65km2)is agriculture.
  • Much of the natural vegetation has been cleared to make use of agricultural soil covering most of the region.
  • Bedrock has limestone and dolostone (fresh water aquifers) as well as other aggregate mineral potential.

Economic Activity

  • Many residents are employed in agriculture: dairy, grains and cattle.
  • Other large industries include transportation and equipment sales and services.
  • BFI Prairie Green landfill disposal grounds.
  • Manitoba Hydro Dorsey Converter Station.

Settlement Composition

  • Mainly agricultural land and unincorporated communities.
  • Rural centres: Rosser, Meadows, Grosse Isle, Marquette.
  • Smaller communities: Bergen, Gordon, Lilyfield, Meadows and Moore.
  • Crown land: Grants Lake Wildlife Management Area.
  • Centreport Canada Area: 44.03 km2 (9.97%) of Rosser’s total land area; population estimate: 213 (15.62%) (Centreport Canada, 2010)
  • Population density: 3.1 per km2 (Statistics Canada, 2011)/
  • Total dwellings: 450 (Statistics Canada, 2011)

Infrastructure Services

  • Regional waterlines in some areas, community wells in others.
  • Private sewer disposal systems, no municipal sewer service.
  • Rosser-Rockwood Wastewater Treatment Lagoon.
  • BFI Prairie Green Disposal Centre.

Development Activity

  • Development Plan: South Interlake Planning District Development Plan 2010:
  • Includes RM of Rosser, RM of Rockwood, Town of Stonewall and Town of Teulon.
  • Resources: Promotes development, extraction and protection of minerals: water aquifers and aggregate mineral potentials.
  • Protection of agricultural land.
  • Jurisdiction for development plans is split between South Interlake Planning District and City of Winnipeg.
  • Jurisdiction for Zoning and By-laws: Split between RM of Rosser and City of Winnipeg.
  • Provincial "Special Planning Area": Centreport.
  • RM has a representative on Centreport’s board of directors.
    • Unique tax sharing agreements (TIF) service agreements (water & wastewater servicing/extension plan).
  • Commercial subdivision has been approved on PTH 7.
  • Applications for quarry developments: applications have been declined due to concerns of negative impact on the environment and quality of life (RM of Rosser website).

Regional Assets

  • Centreport: 54% of Centreport land is in Rosser (Centreport Canada, 2011).
  • Provincial Highways and Centreport Canada Way (Provincial-Federal funded).
  • Grants Lake Wildlife Management Areas.
  • Resources: ground water natural aquifers (local and regional importance) and limestone and aggregate minerals.
  • BFI Prairie Green Disposal grounds.

Regional Challenges

  • Balance agricultural land, environmental concerns and rural lifestyles with new industrial and commercial development (specifically Centreport and quarry development requests).

Visit community website: www.rmofrosser.com

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RM of Springfield

Population: 14,069
Land Area: 1,100km2
Planning District: N/A

Features

History

  • Incorporated in 1873.
  • Represented by reeve and 5 councilors.
  • RM office located in Oakbank.

Geography

  • Eastern upland area and central lowland area distinguish the topography and soils of the District.
  • Highest elevation is 304masl.
  • An extensive man-made drainage system services the RM.

Economic Activity

  • Agriculture is the dominant land use (60.8%) but employs only 6.9% of residents (Statistics Canada, 2006).
  • Employers: business services 17.5%, other services 21.4%.
  • 17.8% of MB’s total horse population (Stats Can Ag, 2006).
  • Higher median household income (Statistics Canada, 2006).
  • Average value of owned dwelling: $208,494 (Statistics Canada Census, 2006).

Settlement Composition

  • Largest community is Oak Bank, also fastest growing.
  • Total private dwellings 4601 (Statistics Canada, 2006).

Infrastructure Services

  • Three waste transfer stations located in the RM.
  • Deep groundwater aquifers: Moosenose & Birds Hill
  • Water: Oakbank water treatment plant (chlorination only), Dugald re-chlorination station (chlorination only), Anola water treatment plant (RM of Springfield, 2009 Annual water system report)
  • Possible extension of water services in the RM.
  • Oakbank, Dugald and Anola have sewage services; rural lots have septic fields.
  • Residential garbage pickup, disposal to facility in Rosser.

Development Activity

  • No development plan, Springfield-Zoning By-Law no 08-01 last amended Feb 3rd 2010.
  • Bipole III terminus at Riel Converter Station; part of a $700 million project.
  • Springfield Centre Administration Building: EOC and Springfield Community Recreation Centre.
  • Future development of a smart park business district.

Regional Assets

  • Shoal Lake Aqueduct travels through the RM to the Deacon Reservoir and treatment plant, which supplies all Winnipeg drinking water.
  • Trans Canada Highway, Lyncrest Airport (within perimeter highway), CPR mainline.
  • Riel Converter station at Deacon’s Corner is the terminus of the new Bipole III hydro project.
  • Birds Hill Provincial Park, hosts the Winnipeg Folk Festival, which attracts 70,000 visitors from across Canada and the United States.
  • Immaculate Conception National Historic Church and Grotto of Our Lady of Lourdes.
  • Red River Floodway expansion and recreation plan.
  • Cooks Creek Conservation District; Gunn Road Industrial Park; North Transcona Industrial Park.

Regional Challenges

  • Springfield is one of very few RMs that own land within the perimeter highway.
  • Spotted knapweed – invasive species identified by BHP as a concern, water issues (Moosenose and BH aquifers).
  • Flooding issues around floodway usage, especially between Hwy 15 and Cooks Creek; drought issues.
  • Potential negative effects of ground electrode at Hazelridge and the Riel Converter Station near Deacon’s Corner.
  • Possible jurisdiction issues with its many neighbours: ie. East St. Paul/North Kildonan development, Transcona Industrial parks.

Visit community website: www.rmofspringfield.ca

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RM of St. Andrews

Population: 11,875
Land Area: 753km2
Planning District: Red River Planning District Area

Features

History

  • The RM was incorporated in 1880.
  • St. Andrews is represented by a reeve and 6 councilors.
  • RM office is located in Clandeboye.

Geography

  • Bordered by the Red River and Lake Winnipeg to the North.
  • Economic Activity
  • St. Andrews regional airport and adjacent business park which employs 150 people (SDPA, 2008).
  • 84% of land is prime agricultural, only 8.4% of residents actually work in the agricultural and resource-gathering sector.
  • The largest number of people are employed in services, business, and in manufacturing (Statistics Canada, 2006).
  • Tourism/recreation at Lake Winnipeg and Lockport.
  • Many residents commute outside the RM to Winnipeg and Selkirk.

Settlement Composition

  • Three settlement centres: Lockport, Clandeboye, and Petersfield (SDPA, 2008).
  • Most settlement is in unincorporated areas along the river.
  • Total dwellings: 4,389, 366 of which are seasonal cottages.
  • A significant number of cottages and trailers are located near Petersfield, Netley Marsh, and Lake Winnipeg.

Infrastructure Services

  • Sewer lines to be laid in the heavily populated southern portion of the RM of St. Andrews in the General Development Area (SDPA, 2008).
  • No plans for sewage lines in Clandeboye or Petersfield.
  • Water sources are primarily wells.
  • There are three landfills servicing the RM: Dunnottar, near Clandboye, and near St. Andrews Airport.

Development Activity

  • Development Plan: Selkirk & District Planning Area:
  • Sustainable development, capital regional co-operation, and protection of existing agricultural land uses.
  • Secondary Plan: Lockport Development Plan:
  • Help direct and shape growth of underutilized areas.
  • Most of the growth in this RM is expected to occur within an area outlined as part of the commutershed for Winnipeg, which is everything south of the northernmost boundary of the city of Selkirk (SDPA, 2008).
  • Areas north of the commutershed, including the Petersfield and Clandeboye settlements are expected to grow very slowly (SDPA, 2008).

Regional Assets

  • The St. Andrews Airport and business park serves more than just the RM; it relieves Richardson International Airport of having to handle smaller commercial carriers and flight training (St. Andrews Airport, 2011).
  • After the "Red River West Wastewater Co-operative" with the RM of West St. Paul did not get approved, the RM of St. Andrews is looking to partner with another RM to provide waste water services (RM of St. Andrews, 2011).
  • Shared advertising with the RM of St. Clements and the City of Selkirk.

Regional Challenges

  • The low terrain elevations, high groundwater levels, and poor surface drainage near Lake Winnipeg and Netley Marsh mean that Petersfield can easily flood when the Red River swells (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 1999).
  • Ice jams on the Red River can create flash floods.
  • The pollution of Lake Winnipeg is a major problem for future sustainability of the lake’s ecosystem and it directly impacts t he RM of St. Andrews in terms of the economic benefits it receives from the lake.
  • Soil erosion is a problem near Lake Winnipeg, the Red River, and other smaller bodies of water (SDPA, 2008).

Visit community website: www.rmofstandrews.com

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RM of St. Clements

Population: 10,505
Land Area: 729km2
Planning District: Red River Planning District Area

Features

History

  • Incorporated in 1883, East Selkirk joined 1904.
  • St. Clements is represented by a mayor and 6 councilors
  • The RM office is located in East Selkirk.

Geography

  • Bordered by Lake Winnipeg and the Red River.
  • Large portion of plains to the south, with forest and marshlands in the north.
  • The flat terrain and clay soils in the area mean poor drainage in many parts of the municipality.
  • 59% of land used for agriculture (Statistics Canada, 2006).

Economic Activity

  • Major employment areas: business services 19%, other services 20%.
  • Tourism (beaches) is a significant source of economic activity.
  • The median income and house prices in St. Clements are above the Manitoba average (Statistics Canada, 2006).

Settlement Composition

  • Two rural settlements: East Selkirk and Libau.
  • The City of Selkirk accross the river is the regional centre.
  • Other centres include Grand Marais, Balsam Bay, Beaconia, East Lockport, and Gull Bay.
  • Significant residential development has occurred along the Red River and in East Selkirk.
  • Total dwellings: 3,670.
  • Population density: 13.3 per km2 (Statistics Canada, 2001).

Infrastructure Services

  • There are 3 waste transfer stations in the RM, a regional landfill in Libau and mechanical treatment in Lockport.
  • Enhanced recycling options at transfer stations and introduction of curbside pickup are under discussion.
  • Primary water source is ground water; well water is suitable in East Selkirk and parts of the resort area in north.
  • East Selkirk water and sewer project nearing completion; extends water and sewer services in the area.

Population

  • The Selkirk District Planning Area has posted positive population growth over the past 20 years (SDPA, 2010).
  • The SDPA could grow by over 26,400 by 2021, 12% of the region’s projected growth (RM of St. Clements website).
  • Over the last 5 years, the RM of St. Clements has shown a rate of population growth of 1.3% per year (SDPA, 2010).
  • The southern portion of the RM is considered a commutershed for Winnipeg and is projected to grow annually at a rate of 2.42% (SDPA, 2010).

Development Activity

  • Development Plan: Selkirk and District Development Plan.
  • Includes St. Andrews, St. Clements, West St. Paul, City of Selkirk, and Village of Dunnottar.
  • Serves as a framework to guide secondary plans, zoning by-laws, and development agreements in the SDPA.
  • Secondary Plans: Several secondary plans are currently under development in the RM.
  • St. Clements has outlined a 4-year plan that sets out the priorities for the municipality: flood prevention, environment, roads & drainage, growth management, economic development, and recreation.
  • St. Clements has the highest number of subdivision approvals and single-family dwelling permits in the SDPA.

Regional Assets

  • Regional landfill in Libau.
  • Grand Beach, Birds Hill and Lockport provincial parks.
  • Red River Floodway expansion and recreation plan.
  • Mechanical treatment plant (sewage) in Lockport; St. Andrews lock and dam (Lockport)
  • Regional library and possible heritage museum in Selkirk.
  • Largest inventory of historic sites after Winnipeg.

Regional Challenges

  • Challenge of focusing growth in appropriate locations.
  • Competition for services between rural and urban areas.
  • Soils in SDPA are ill suited to on-site waste management.
  • Boil water advisories, septic field failures, flood protection & prevention and erosion.
  • Impacts of agriculture and livestock development.

Visit community website: www.rmofstclements.com

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RM of St. François Xavier

Population: 1,240
Land Area: 205km2
Planning District: White Horse Plains Planning District

Features

History

  • Incorporated in 1880.
  • Represented by a reeve and four ward coucilors.
  • The RM offices are located in the town of St. François Xavier.

Geography

  • The RM of St. François Xavier is located directly north of the Assiniboine River that forms the common boundary with the RM of Cartier.
  • Land adjacent to the river is divided using the river lot system.

Economic Activity

  • Economic activity in the RM of St. François Xavier is driven by the agriculture industry.
  • Agriculture combined with business services make up the major areas of employment in the RM (Statistics Canada).
  • St. François Xavier has a lower unemployment rate when compared with the provincial average for the Province of Manitoba.

Settlement Composition

  • The unincorporated town of St. François Xavier is the major settlement centre in the RM.
  • There are other smaller settlement areas.
  • There are 385 occupied private dwellings in the RM. • According to the White Horse Plains Planning District Development Plan, the town of St. François Xavier will be the focus for most residential and non-resource based land uses.

Infrastructure Services

  • St. François Xavier is serviced by the Cartier Regional Water Co-op.
  • There are sewage lagoon and dump sites in the RM.
  • Provincial Trunk Highway 26 is the major transportation link in the RM.

Population

  • St. François Xavier is experienceing a rapid state of population growth.
  • Since 1991, the population has grown by 21.0%

Development Activity

  • Planning District Plan: White Horse Plains Planning District Development Plan was Adopted April, 2010.
  • Incorporates both the RM of Cartier and the RM of St. François Xavier.
  • Aligned closely with the Manitoba Planning Act.
  • Sets out basic planning directions and processes.
  • Development to be focused in settlement centres.
  • Prepared by MB Dept. of Local Government & Landmark Planning/Design
  • Secondary Plan: St. François Xavier Settlement Centre
  • Comprehensive plan for town site of St. François Xavier.
  • Prepared by MMM Group (2010)
  • MPPI award winnipeg secondary plan.

Regional Assets

  • Comprehensive plan for town site of St. François Xavier.
  • White Horse Plains Planning District Office located in the town of St. François Xavier.
  • The Assiniboine River is an important natural regional feature.
  • Dikes along the north bank of the Assiniboine River prevent flooding through the RM.
  • Part of the La Salle Redboine Conservation District (MB Water Stewardship).

Regional Challenges

  • The Headingly Bypass process has frozen development at the intersection of Hwy. 26 and Hwy. 1. This area has a number of planning ideas that cannot be implemented until the province makes a decision about this project.
  • Threats from flooding of the Assiniboine River.
  • Planning for increased growth rates when compared with other RM’s and communities within the capital region.

Visit community website: www.rm-stfrancois.mb.ca

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RM of Taché

Population: 10,284
Land Area: 582km2
Planning District: N/A

Features

History

  • The Rural Municipality of Taché was incorporated in 1880.
  • Represented by a mayor and 6 councilors.
  • Municipal offices are located in Lorette.

Geography

  • Located along HWY 1, the RM of Taché is situated 61km south-east of Winnipeg.
  • Adjacent to the Red River Floodway.
  • The RM of Taché falls within the Seine River Watershed.
  • Two distinct geographical areas. Central lowland area: characterized by high quality, class 1/2 soils suitable for a wide range of agricultural uses. Southeastern lake terrace area is characterized by a variety of soil types, quality and cover.

Economic Activity

  • Agriculture is the dominant land use in the RM. The resource character and historical development has resulted in an intermixture of farming, intensive livestock and dairy production, forage cropping, aggregate extraction, peat soil removal and residential development.
  • Agriculture together with other resource-based industries employ 8 % of the population.
  • Other industries are as follows: Business services 15%, other services 19%, manufacturing 14%, healthcare 10%, retail trade 10%, construction 11%, educational services 8%, wholesale trade 3%, finance and real estate 3%. (Statistics Canada Census, 2006).
  • In 2006 there was a serious fire at an intensive live-stock facility in Taché, resulting in 5 million dollars in damage and the loss of 5,500 hogs.

Settlement Composition

  • Major urban settlements are Landmark and Village of Lorette. Smaller urban centres are Dufresne, St. Geneviève, Ross, Linden and Oak Island.

Infrastructure Services

  • According to the 2000 Development Plan, Lorette is growing rapidly and needs a new sewage lagoon.
  • Landmark garbage pick-up provided by Pak-Man disposals on a weekly basis. • Major public works department in Lorette.

Development Activity

  • 2 acre lots for sale in Lorette.
  • Water splash pad approved to be built in the RM of Taché.
  • Dillon consulting completed a Recreation Needs Study in 2011.

Regional Assets

  • The RM of Taché has two landfill sites, one in Monominto and the other is south of Lorette.
  • 2 acre lots for sale in Lorette.
  • 3 fire halls are located within the RM.

Regional Challenges

  • Conservation of high quality agricultural land (from development, residential and otherwise).
  • Taché is located on the floodway plains.

Visit community website: www.rmtache.ca

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RM of West St. Paul

Population: 4,932
Land Area: 88km2
Planning District: Red River Planning District Area

Features

History

  • Incorporated in 1916.
  • Followed the earlier RM of St. Paul which was established in 1880.
  • Represented by a mayor and 4 councillors.
  • RM office located in Middlechurch.

Geography

  • Located immediately north of Winnipeg.
  • The boundary with East St. Paul is formed by the Red River and Grassmere Creek which flows from west to east, joining the Red River at Middlechurch.
  • There are forested areas along the Red River but the majority of the municipality is prairie.
  • Second-smallest municipality in the Capital Region of which 62.8 km2 is farmland.

Economic Activity

  • Agriculture is the dominant land use, however, there are only 26 farms and 40 operators.
  • Concentration of 7 cemeteries and memorial manufacturing.
  • West St. Paul Industrial Park under development off McPhillips Street just south of the Perimeter Highway.
  • Middlechurch Seniors Home is the largest single employer in the RM.
  • Buhler Manufacturing and Mulder Construction are significant employers.
  • 72% of workforce commutes to Winnipeg (StatsCan, 2006).
  • Average income is $72,912 vs. Manitoba median $47,875.
  • Average house prices is $247,494 vs. Manitoba median.
  • Unemployment is 1.6%.

Settlement Composition

  • Population and development is concentrated along Main St. between the CPR line and the Red River.
  • Includes the older settlement centres of Middlechurch and Rivercrest as well as the more recent residential developments of Riverdale, Lister Rapids, and River’s Edge.
  • Total Dwellings: 1,469 (Statistics Canada, 2006).
  • Density: 49.7 people/km2 (Statistics Canada, 2006).

Infrastructure Services

  • Water from individual wells.
  • Community sewage treatment plants in suburban residential developments discharged to Red River.
  • Septic fields in rural areas.
  • Weekly curbside garbage and recycling pickup.
  • Solid waste transported to BFI facility in Rosser.

Development Activity

  • Selkirk and District Planning Area plan (2010):
  • Part of the Red River northern corridor along with the RMs of St. Andrews and St. Clements and the City of Selkirk.
  • Secondary Plan: Middlechurch Development Plan (RM of West St. Paul, 2010):
  • Residential development is to occur mostly in the suburban communities between Main Street and the Red River and along the southern border with the City of Winnipeg.
  • A small amount of large-lot rural development is permitted in two designated areas.
  • Commercial and mixed-use development is focused along Main Street.
  • Major commercial development proposed for the southwest corner of the Main Street & Perimeter Highway interchange.
  • Secondary Plan: West St. Paul Employment Lands (Lombard North, 2011):
  • Focal point for industrial development southwest of the McPhillips Street & Perimeter Highway interchange.
  • Has begun to develop over the past decade.

Regional Assets

  • Major Highways: Perimeter Highway (PTH 101), Main Street (PTH 9), McPhillips Street (PTH 8).
  • Middlechurch Seniors Home Sunova Recreation Centre.
  • North Perimeter Park boat launch.

Regional Challenges

  • Sustainable land use and development is a priority for the Selkirk & District Planning Area.
  • Flooding, especially resulting from ice jams on the Red River as with the 2009 spring flood.

Visit community website: www.weststpaul.com

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Maps

Click here - to use the PMCR's interactive mapping platform with the most up to date regional demographic available for the Manitoba capital region.

The following data is included (where available) for each rural municipality in the capital region:

  • Population by Age and Gender
  • Household Income
  • Labour Force
  • Educational Attainment

Click here to access the map.

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Stay up to Date

Please fill out the form below and we will be sure to notify you of all that is happening with the Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region:

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Contact Us

We appreciate having the opportunity to communicate with you. Feel free to contact us at the address below if you have any questions or require additional information about Manitoba's Capital Region.

Manitoba Capital Region
Unit 1 - 1749 Portage Ave
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3J 0E6
Phone: (204) 989-2048
E-mail: info@manitobacapitalregion.ca

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Environment and Water Quality

Our future is defined by the quality of the environment. We understand the need to connect decision making to the environment and to link individual, regional and global actions. The Capital Region must measure success by the health of our environment, including the protection of our natural and agriculture lands, the quality of our water, the health of our lakes and the quality of the air we breathe. On a broader stage it is measured by our impacts on global warming. The Capital Region environment must be protected through intentional strategies and practices.

Read the full report here.

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Principles

Managing Our Water Resources

Clean, safe and reliable drinking water should be available to every resident of the Capital Region. We also need to protect our ground water and surface water resources. Understanding and acknowledging the importance of water protection will ensure we have clean, fresh water for everyday usages as well as for business and industry.

Protecting Our Natural Lands

Protecting natural and agriculture lands is key to the sustainable development of Manitoba’s Capital Region. Natural areas should be identified and protected to ensure the continued ecological benefits are available for future generations.

Addressing Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation

Local decisions have a direct and indirect impact on the region’s ecological footprint. Decisions about new development, alternate transportation options and the way we use existing settlement areas can help reduce greenhouse gases thereby having a long-term positive impact on global warming. Adaptive measures such as flood protection and planning for unforeseen events must be taken into account in the development of up-to-date emergency planning.

Encouraging Sustainability and Local Action

'Thinking globally and acting locally' requires plans to address local and regional environmental issues. When the environment becomes a priority in sustainable decision-making there can be positive short and long-term benefits. The Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region will encourage education on sustainability for decision makers and promote broader public engagement strategies toward local action.

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Strategies and Goals

Ensure the Provision of Safe, Clean Drinking Water

PROVIDE ACCESS TO SAFE, CLEAN DRINKING WATER
Extending existing water supply sources, developing new sources where necessary and protecting ground water sources all contribute to ensure clean, safe and reliable drinking water for every resident of the region.

PROLONG THE LIFE OF WATER SUPPLY SOURCES
Efforts to reduce water consumption through conservation measures and grey water recycling can help prolong the life of water sources by keeping consumption levels within the limits of supply.

ADOPT LAKE FRIENDLY PRACTICES
Engage Capital Region municipalities in the adoption of Lake Friendly Beneficial Management Practices aimed at protecting our fresh water resources.

Manage Water Resources

ESTABLISH AN INTER-MUNICIPAL WATERSHED FOCUS AND REGIONAL WATER STUDY
Watersheds do not conform to municipal boundaries. A Capital Region approach to watershed management requires both regional cooperation and coordination to ensure the quality of our lakes, river and streams are protected and we understand the constraints of our regional water supply.

REDUCE EXCESS NUTRIENTS THAT CONTRIBUTE TO ALGAL GROWTH
Lakes across Manitoba are experiencing excess algal growth. Lake Winnipeg has become a serious and complex issue with wide ranging implications. Protecting our fresh water resources requires appropriate regional strategies to mitigate and manage nutrients.

Manage Wastewater Effectively

UPDATE WASTEWATER AND SEWAGE TREATMENT
Updating municipal infrastructure and replacing septic systems with centralized wastewater and sewage systems can help protect the environment and safeguard groundwater quality. Updating and replacing municipal infrastructure to manage waste more effectively will ensure the protection of ground and surface water sources and reduce negative impacts to our lakes, rivers and streams.

EXPLORE OPPORTUNITIES TO IMPLEMENT NEW TECHNOLOGIES AND PRACTICES FOR WASTE MANAGEMENT
Options for managing wastewater that are environmentally sound should be explored to ensure we protect our lands and water while introducing beneficial management practices in ways that gain greater acceptance.

Protect Agriculture Lands, Natural Lands and Green Space

UNDERSTAND ECOLOGICAL GOODS AND SERVICES
Recognizing ecological goods and services first requires the identification and understanding of the importance of these natural areas and the benefits they provide to us. A regional Bioeconomy Atlas is a useful framework for understanding the benefits of the existing ecological infrastructure toward developing clean, green technological opportunities while supporting sustainable development policies and collaborative planning in the region.

SUPPORT BIO-DIVERSITY AND PROMOTE ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS
Protecting natural and agriculture lands protects biodiversity. Wetlands, marshes and riparian areas must be protected as these areas contribute greatly to a biodiverse capital region.

PROTECT AGRICULTURE LANDS, NATURAL LANDS AND GREEN SPACE
Prime agriculture lands within the Capital Region must be protected to ensure food security and to support the agri-economy. The protection of green space and natural lands must be a focus of development planning.

Mitigate Climate Change and Plan for Adaptation

DEVELOP AND PROMOTE ADAPTATION PRACTICES
As the impacts of climate change are felt, some measures can be taken to adapt to our changing environment. This will require regional approaches to planning for non-stationarity.

REDUCE GREENHOUSE GASES
A regional approach to mitigating the impacts of climate change is an effective way to encourage alternative technologies and innovative development practices.

INCORPORATE RENEWABLE ENERGY AND CLEAN TECHONOLOGY
Actively incorporating renewable energy options such as solar provides communities with greater energy security as we are less dependent on a single source. These options can also provide economic pay back and reduce our carbon footprint.

Promote Environmental Awareness and Education for Sustainability

PROMOTE ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS AND ACTIVE LIVING
As a part of a larger ecological infrastructure, the PMCR can define natural areas that provide ecological goods and services, enhance connectivity and create accessible green space. Effective communication about these initiatives can create greater acceptance by the public and inform and inspire residents to engage in individual and collective action.

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Environment and Water Quality

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Economic Development, Marketing and Tourism

The Capital Region is the population centre and the economic engine of the Province. The strength of the region, as it moves into the future, will depend on the ability of its members to find advantage in cooperative, coordinated decision-making, particularly as it relates to the pursuit of economic opportunities. Tourism is an area of common interest and regional marketing can be an effective strategy in the promotion of Manitoba’s Capital Region.

Read the full report here.

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Principles

Competitiveness

For the region to grow economically, it must be able to establish a level playing field with other economic regions and must be well positioned to compete effectively thereafter.

Communication

Effective communication and stakeholder engagement can lead to significant opportunities that would otherwise be unachievable.

Partnerships

Alliances with government, arms-length governmental agencies, the private sector and the not-for-profit sector can build on collective strengths leading to a situation where the total is indeed greater than the sum of its parts.

Shared Prosperity

For individual partners to 'think and act as a region' requires a non-competitive environment where the benefits of regional successes are enjoyed by all, where 'a rising tide raises all boats'

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Strategies and Goals

Pursue Opportunities for Regional Economic Growth

BUILD STRATEGIC MUTUALLY-BENEFICIAL RELATIONSHIPS
It is important to ensure mutually supportive relationships with organizations such as CentrePort, Economic Development Winnipeg, the Provincial Economic Development Offices, among others, that are promoting the region’s competitive advantages.

MARKET THE REGION AS A SINGLE COMPETITIVE ENTITY
An effective communication and marketing strategy can lead to investment opportunities and economic development that can benefit the region as a whole.

BE ECONOMICALLY COMPETITIVE AS A REGION
The ability to compete effectively requires working in collaboration with senior levels of government and economic development agencies to develop a clear and comprehensive strategy to build regional capacity and promote strategic advantage.

SEEK WAYS TO ENSURE ALL PARTNERS BENEFIT FROM ECONOMIC GROWTH
Regional economic growth can be enhanced if an environment is created where all members have an opportunity to benefit economically.

PROMOTE LABOUR FORCE DEVELOPMENT
Capital Region communities must work pro-actively with educational institutions, government departments and industry to ensure we have appropriately skilled workforces to meet future demands.

ENGAGE IN THE INTERNATIONAL MARKETPLACE
The PMCR should participate in activities to promote international investment and actively seek information and innovation in technologies that better position the region, globally.

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Economic Development

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Documents

Click on one of the options to your left

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Websites

Below is a listing of websites for reference. Click a title to view the website.

Interlake Tourism Association
Links to many tourism facilities all over the Interlake.

Manitoba Department of Industry, Trade and Mines
Government site with links to small business ideas, trade and promotion information.

Manitoba Tourism Education Council
Resources for those involved in Manitoba's tourism including training links and a "Manitoba Proud" site.

Travel Manitoba
Site complete with event schedules, ideas for places to visit and weather information.

Community Futures Manitoba
Assists Manitoba entrepreneurs and community economic development volunteers to easily find the information they need to start their business or to grow their community.

Economic Development Winnipeg
Economic Development Winnipeg Inc. (EDW) is focused on being a leader in promoting Winnipeg as the ideal place to live, work, invest and visit through economic development and tourism-related initiatives.

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Maps

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Maps

Click here - to use the PMCR's interactive mapping platform with the most up to date regional demographic available for the Manitoba capital region.

The following data is included (where available) for each rural municipality in the capital region:

  • Population by Age and Gender
  • Household Income
  • Labour Force
  • Educational Attainment

Click here to access the map.

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Transportation and Shared Services

If the Capital Region is to function effectively as more than the sum of its parts, it will be largely due to the manner in which the provision of services and infrastructure are addressed on a regional scale. Addressing transportation as a comprehensive, integrated network is fundamental as is the pursuit of service-sharing agreements to promote an expanded range of services while ensuring the effcient use of resources.

Read the full report here.

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Principles

Interconnectedness

Interconnectedness is a given in today’s technology age, a concept that applies in a like manner to the physical environment whereby a variety of transportation options is supportive of a mix of land uses which in turn is supported by requisite hard and soft infrastructure and other public services.

Balanced Mobility Options

While road systems for the effective movement of people and goods remains a high priority, this must be balanced with alternative transportation options like public transit, car pooling, cycling, and walking that can benefit the region through healthier lifestyle choices, the reduced traffic congestion, and improvements in air quality.

Regional Cooperation

Developing a regional perspective towards services requires that we have good information regarding current trends and issues and that we keep all stakeholders informed about the benefits of regional cooperation towards service delivery.

Equity in Service Provision

While it is understood that not every resident and business can have 'equal' access to all public services, a commitment to ‘equity’ implies a desire to ensure fairness in service provision, balancing expectations with cost and practicality.

Effective and Effcient Use of Resources

Driven by the reasonable public expectation for the wise use of public dollars and for transparent and accountable decision-making, resources need to be used in a manner that maximizes public benefit with measurable results.

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Strategies and Goals

Activate Regional and Inter-Municipal Service Sharing

SUPPORT REGIONAL COOPERATION
Support and partner to develop a regional perspective through the use of effective, engaging and accessible information sharing and communication strategies.

CAPITALIZE ON COLLECTIVE SERVICE-SHARING EXPERIENCES
A significant number of inter-municipal agreements are in place and can be used in the creation of templates to facilitate further agreements.

ENCOURAGE SERVICE-SHARING FOR INTERNAL ADMINISTRATIVE FUNCTIONS
Planning districts exemplify the benefit of inter-municipal agreements for administrative functions, a concept that can be extended to such things as legal and accounting services, technology support and bulk purchasing.

ENCOURAGE SERVICE-SHARING FOR PUBLIC SERVICES
Whether it’s the extension of infrastructure such as water, wastewater and roads, or jointly constructing facilities such as libraries and arenas, or extending the breadth of programs such as fire protection, public transit, mosquito abatement and sport participation, inter-municipal agreements can save costs while expanding public benefits.

SUPPORT SERVICE-SHARING NEGOTIATION PROCESSES
Establishing a negotiation process and a common dispute resolution function for inter-municipal and regional service-sharing opportunities is a very important part in the facilitation and pursuit of a broader range of service-sharing agreements.

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Transportation and Shared Services

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Economic Development, Marketing and Tourism

The Capital Region is the population centre and the economic engine of the Province. The strength of the region, as it moves into the future, will depend on the ability of its members to find advantage in cooperative, coordinated decision-making, particularly as it relates to the pursuit of economic opportunities. Tourism is an area of common interest and regional marketing can be an effective strategy in the promotion of Manitoba’s Capital Region.

Read the full report here.

Close

Principles

Competitiveness

For the region to grow economically, it must be able to establish a level playing field with other economic regions and must be well positioned to compete effectively thereafter.

Communication

Effective communication and stakeholder engagement can lead to significant opportunities that would otherwise be unachievable.

Partnerships

Alliances with government, arms-length governmental agencies, the private sector and the not-for-profit sector can build on collective strengths leading to a situation where the total is indeed greater than the sum of its parts.

Shared Prosperity

For individual partners to 'think and act as a region' requires a non-competitive environment where the benefits of regional successes are enjoyed by all, where 'a rising tide raises all boats'

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Strategies and Goals

Increase Tourism in Manitoba’s Capital Region

ENCOURAGE THE DEVELOPMENT OF OUR TOURISM INFRASTRUCTURE
Develop strategies that promote investment in infrastructure that will draw more tourists into the Capital Region and meet their needs once they arrive.

Work with all levels of government to facilitate international tourism and eliminate barriers for potential tourists.

PROMOTE THE REGION AS A DESTINATION
Identify the collection of attractions scattered throughout the region, including facilities and events that draw local, national and international visitors for business and pleasure.

Develop a series of promotional materials and campaigns in relation to tourism in the region, with emphasis on specific areas of interest like recreation, sports and eco-tourism.

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Economic Development, Marketing and Tourism

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Preferred Partner Network

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Partner Network

PMCR’s Partner Network showcases some of the businesses, consultants, service providers or suppliers who are contributing to a thriving Manitoba Capital Region. PMCR’s partners are committed to a strong and sustainable Capital Region and play a key role in the success of our organization.

We believe in working collaboratively, not only as regional governments, but also with industry, business and other organizations. Incredible talent and resources are thriving in the Capital Region and connecting across sectors and regional boundaries is essential for sustainable growth. PMCR creates a forum for the collaborative work of all stakeholders to ensure decisions benefit from a diversity of expertise and experience. Our members need to hear from voices in business, industry and research to make better, more sustainable decisions — we are committed to supporting this connection through the PMCR Partner Network.

If you are interested in cultivating relationships and supporting the work of Capital Region decision makers, and would like to join the Partner Network:

>> Review our Partner Network outline
>> Contact us at 204.989.2048 or info@manitobacapitalregion.ca

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Our Partners

Barnes & Duncan
www.barnesduncan.com

Barnes & Duncan is a locally owned multidisciplinary firm specializing in Land Surveying, Construction Surveying, Municipal Engineering and Geographic Information Systems. With a history dating back more than 100 years, we have a tremendous amount of knowledge and experience in the firm related to all types of land development projects. We provide professional services to land developers, construction companies, all levels of government including rural municipalities and various other professionals such as architects, lawyers and other engineering firms. If you have a project that involves Land Surveying, Municipal Engineering, Construction Surveying or Geographic Information Systems, we can help develop those opportunities.

 

D'Arcy & Deacon LLP
www.darcydeacon.com

D'Arcy & Deacon LLP has provided leading legal services in the Province of Manitoba for over 130 years and in the Province of Alberta for over 20 years. With offices in Winnipeg and Calgary, D’Arcy & Deacon LLP has more than 40 lawyers practicing in most major areas of the law.

Orvel Currie and Jennifer Hanson of D’Arcy & Deacon LLP have broad experience advising provincial and municipal governments as well as private sector businesses. Specifically, they have experience in Ontario, British Columbia, Manitoba and Alberta acting as lead counsel to municipal, provincial and federal governmental entities with respect to labour matters, multi-million dollar public private partnership projects and in construction and infrastructure projects including P3 projects. Their experience includes advising federal, provincial, and public sector entities with respect to public private partnership, environmental projects, projects concerning health and safety law in western Canada, large contracts, and alternative dispute resolutions. As well, they have experience advising public sector entities for the construction and tendering of utility projects in Western Canada; as well as builder’s liens, construction liens and regulatory requirements.

We would be pleased to discuss our experience with you further and to provide you with specific examples of our direct experience and achievements. Please contact Orvel directly at 204.957.6401 or ocurrie@darcydeacon.com. Jennifer can be reached directly at 204.977.0326 or jhanson@darcydeacon.com.

 

Dillon Consulting
www.dillon.ca

Dillon Consulting is an international, Canadian-owned professional consulting organization committed to guiding our clients towards the successful application of science, technology and management. As a client-centred organization, we operate as members of your team, ensuring that your needs and aspiration are fulfilled and that your problems are solved innovatively, expeditiously and cost-effectively. Partnership is the core philosophy that drives our business. It is reflected in both our approach to client relationships, and in our willingness to participate in joint ventures with others in the field. In practice, it means we strive to establish a long-term relationship with you, the client, to understand your concerns, your mandates, your strategies, the way you operate, and what your clients and the public expect.

Since its inception, the company has grown steadily in services provided, range of expertise, geographic scope and size. We operate across Canada in Asia, the Caribbean Region, the United States and Central and South America. Our employees have skills in over 30 distinct disciplines, and include professional engineers, architects, planners, economists, and physical and social scientists. We are experienced in working independently, within integrated project teams, and through a variety of project delivery methods including design-build, public-private partnerships, and conventional consultant-owner relationships.

 

Economic Development Winnipeg
www.economicdevelopmentwinnipeg.com

 

Fahr Group
www.fahrgroup.ca

The Fahr Group helps land owners and municipalities make the most of their land development opportunities with a planning process that is good for our clients, the land, the community and the people that will raise their families there. We have been an integral part of Manitoba’s rural business community since 1956 and our agricultural heritage is essential to our vision and our values. We find innovative ways to celebrate the unique local geography, support the environment and enable a desirable community lifestyle. As a full service Land Development and Planning firm we work to build healthy open and honest relationships in our business undertakings as we continue to build on our experience and welcome new opportunities.

 

MMM Group Limited
www.mmmgrouplimited.com

MMM Group Limited is a multidisciplinary consulting firm creating vibrant and healthy communities through innovative transportation, planning, engineering, geomatics, and project management services. We are an industry leader providing cutting-edge, personalized, and practical solutions that help our public and private clients seize opportunities, address risks, and navigate regulations to create award-winning projects.

 

Solar Solutions Inc.
www.solarsolutions.ca

Solar Solutions Inc. is a full-service renewable energy company serving commercial, institutional and industrial clients. Locally owned and in operation for over 25 years, Solar Solutions team of professionals design, manufacture and integrate advanced solar energy systems and conservation products for a wide variety of applications.

Through industry leading system engineering and service delivery, Solar Solutions knowledge, experience and quality products deliver predictable results and long term value to clients and communities across Canada and around the world. Whether large or small, Solar Solutions renewable energy projects save money, generate dependable power and reduce reliance on fossil fuels.

 

Stantec
www.stantec.com

Stantec unites more than 13,000 employees working in over 200 locations. We collaborate across disciplines and industries to bring buildings, energy and resource, and infrastructure projects to life. Our work—professional consulting in planning, engineering, architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, surveying, environmental sciences, project management, and project economics—begins at the intersection of community, creativity, and client relationships.

 

Winnipeg Airports Authority Inc
www.waa.ca

Winnipeg Airports Authority Inc. is responsible for the management and operation of Winnipeg Richardson International Airport, a full-service airport providing passengers and cargo clients access to markets across Canada, the United States, Mexico and the world. Located at the geographic centre of North America, with round-the-clock operations, Winnipeg Richardson International Airport is the number one dedicated freighter airport in Canada as measured by the number of flights. The airport generates over $3.6 billion in total economic output and welcomes over 3.5 million passengers annually.

 

World Trade Centre Winnipeg
www.wtcwinnipeg.com

 

WSP
www.wspgroup.com

WSP is one of the world’s leading professional services firms, working with governments, businesses, architects and planners and providing integrated solutions across many disciplines. We provide services to transform the built environment and restore the natural environment; our expertise ranges from environmental remediation to urban planning, from engineering iconic buildings to designing sustainable transport networks, and from developing the energy sources of the future to enabling new ways of extracting essential resources. Our Winnipeg office has a staff of 150 professionals, including engineers, technicians, scientists, architects, planners, landscape architects, environmental scientists and interior design professionals, Our global team consists of approximately 6,650 employees in Canada and a total 32,000 employees world-wide, based in more than 500 offices, across 39 countries. They cover the professions listed above and many others including economists, archaeologists, biologists, sociologists and more.